1-MIN READ

Toxic Algae in Oceans Triggered by Melting Snowcaps in Himalayas are Visible from Space

Toxic Algae in Oceans Triggered by Melting Snowcaps in Himalayas are Visible from Space

NASA has also shared images, showing the presence of Noctiluca on the coast of the Arabian Sea.

Share this:

The bioluminescent lights fill us with joy at times, but what if these are harmful to your health and are available in abundance? Well, the current climate change consequence up in the Himalayas is resulting in something similar in the Arabian Sea. In fact, it is so wide and evident that the scene can be viewed from the space as well.

A study recently published in Nature Scientific Reports clearly state a steady decline in snow cover extent over the Himalayan-Tibetan Plateau region. This, in turn, is resulting in the stratification of the upper layer of the Arabian Sea at a much faster rate than predicted by global climate models.

The coasts of the Arabian Sea, on the border of India and Pakistan, have traces of Noctiluca scintillans. These sea creatures, also known as ‘sea sparkle’, are planktonic organisms that form thick green swirls and filaments.

They force out planktons, causing massive destruction to the sea’s food chain. As a result, the survival of fishes is threatened.

Joaquim Goes, a researcher at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, mention to DailyMail, “This is probably one of the most dramatic changes that we have seen that's related to climate change”.

The Noctiluca has also expanded to other Southeast Asia parts, including the coasts of Thailand, Vietnam, and Seychelles.

NASA has also shared images, showing the presence of Noctiluca on the coast of the Arabian Sea, causing a great threat to its existence and the food chain.


Share this:
Next Story
corona virus btn
corona virus btn
Loading