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US Court Says the Night King from 'Game of Thrones' Was Completely 'Meaningless'

US Court Says the Night King from 'Game of Thrones' Was Completely 'Meaningless'

For the unversed, season eight of 'Game of Thrones' saw the Night King being talked up to be the evilest force in entire Westeros, only to be killed by Arya Stark (Maisie Williams) in the third episode, The Long Night, halfway through the season.

Turns out, the Night King from the hugely popular Game of Thrones has been rendered 'useless' in a US court.

According to a story published in Metro UK, Judge John B Owens, who was appointed by Obama to the federal judiciary opined in a case concerning breaches of fiduciary duties, that basically deals with legal or ethical relationship of trust with another party or parties, and usually takes care of their money or assets, making a not-so-subtle reference to the Night King.

For the unversed, season eight of Game of Thrones saw the Night King being talked up to be the evilest force in entire Westeros, only to be killed by Arya Stark (Maisie Williams) in the third episode, "The Long Night," halfway through the season.

While fans have argued for long over the Night King's defeat lamenting the dreadful ending to an otherwise amazing buildup for a plotline for over eight seasons, Judge Owens turned him into an example for a case of law when he mentioned the leader of the white walkers as he referred to two other cases, Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith, Inc. v. Dabit, and Chadbourne & Parke LLP v. Troice, in his opinion.

Judge Owens said that while the defendant would like them to read Dabit without considering its clarification in Troice, "But we will not render Troice meaningless in the way that Game Of Thrones rendered the entire Night King storyline meaningless in its final season."

The reference was shared by a Twitter user Ann Lipton, who is a professor from Tulane Law School, who joked, "Goddammit, now I'm going to have to watch Game of Thrones just to be able to do my research? Thanks for nothing, Ninth Circuit."

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