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Video Buffering? Japan Sets Record for Internet Speed at 319 Terabits per Second

Japan has managed to transfer data at a whopping 391 terabits per second, which is equal to 48, 875 gigabytes per second. (Representative Image, Credits: Shutterstock)

Japan has managed to transfer data at a whopping 391 terabits per second, which is equal to 48, 875 gigabytes per second. (Representative Image, Credits: Shutterstock)

According to the institute's report, in a first, the Japanese researchers have used a four-core optical fiber, however, the diameter of the optical fiber is almost the same.

With data getting more and more prominent, transferring huge amounts of it in less time has become the new muse for researchers all across the globe. Researchers at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, Tokyo, Japan, have broken a record in the world of optical fibre and internet speed. They have managed to transfer data at a whopping 391 terabits per second, which is equal to 48, 875 gigabytes per second. To put things in perspective, the average internet speed in India is 0.012 gigabytes per second. The set record is almost double the previous record, which was 178 terabits per second set by researchers at the University College London in the year 2020

Generally, optical fibres are single-cored due to their compatibility with the cabling infrastructure and mechanical reliability. According to the institute’s report, in the first, the Japanese researchers have used a four-core optical fibre; however, the diameter of the optical fibre is almost the same. The researchers coiled the fibres to simulate a distance of 3001 kilometres.

Optical fibres, over long distances, have significantly less transmission loss compared to other coaxial or electric cables. However, data transmitted over long distances need to be transferred without any loss, for which the attenuation has to be compensated all along. The researchers have used a meticulous concoction of rare-earth-doped fibres (erbium and thulium), Raman amplification (Stimulated Raman Scattering), and semiconductor optical amplifiers. The fibres operate in the range of S, C, and L-bands, the wavelength for which, ranges from 1460-1625 nanometers.

The current technology used is not cheap and, for now, will be used to push data across vast distances, rather than, say, letting you download your favourite show. However, the researchers believe that enabling such a high data transmission rate can become the backbone of future communication systems.

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5G has been introduced in the world and is a new experience of fast speed altogether. But technology is a feeble domain. It won’t be long when 5G is incompatible with satisfying people’s data needs. Such researches will be vital for the world that lies beyond 5G.

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first published:July 19, 2021, 11:21 IST