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Video of 2 Million Hong Kong Protesters Making Way for Ambulance Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity

Video of 2 Million Hong Kong Protesters Making Way for Ambulance Will Restore Your Faith in Humanity

The protesters, who cleared out of Hong Kong's streets on Monday, are demanding that Chief Executive Carrie Lam resign and abandon a bill that would allow extradition from Hong Kong to mainland China.

An estimated two million people who held a day-long protest march in Hong Kong were back in the night to clean the streets.

“Occupiers are doing one last sweep for rubbish," author Kong Tsung-gan wrote on Twitter after the region saw its largest ever public protests on Sunday.

"Two million people marched here yesterday, it was occupied all night, and there isn’t a scrap of rubbish on the road,” he said.

Ennie Chan, one of the protesters, told The Independent from Hong Kong that he saw “young people holding different bags to take trash away last night. There were a lot of people clearing rubbish." Videos which have gone viral on social media also showed disciplined crowds letting ambulances pass through and looking after children and elderly people. “Hong Kong protesters let an ambulance go through the massive protest,” a journalist posted on Twitte.

The video clip, which has been viewed over four million times, shows an ambulance passing through a sea of people as the crowd parts way for the medical emergency.

"When ambulances came, people at the front would signal with their hands to people at the back to move back," Chan said.

There were obvious comparisons to how a similar protest might have turned out in India, Pakistan or other countries.

“Imagine if it was #Pakistan, #India, #Bangladesh,” one Twitter user wrote.

The protesters, who cleared out of Hong Kong's streets on Monday, are demanding that Chief Executive Carrie Lam resign and abandon a bill that would allow extradition from Hong Kong to mainland China.

Lam, who offered an apology on Tuesday, said she had heard the protestors “loud and clear” and “reflected deeply on what has transpired.”