News18» News»Buzz»Viral YouTube Video 'Charlie Bit My Finger' is Now Being Sold Online as NFT
3-MIN READ

Viral YouTube Video 'Charlie Bit My Finger' is Now Being Sold Online as NFT

Image Credits: YouTube/HDCYT

Image Credits: YouTube/HDCYT

The video, which features a child biting the index finger of his elder brother, has nearly 880 million views and will be taken down after the completion of the auction.

One of Youtube’s most viral videos, ‘Charlie bit my finger’, is set to be auctioned by its creators as a non-fungible token (NFT). The video, which features a child biting the index finger of his elder brother, has nearly 880 million views and will be taken down after the completion of the auction process on May 23 that marks exactly 14 years since the video was posted. The adorable video shows young Harry sitting on the sofa with his little brother Charlie. Harry offers his finger to Charlie who bites it as Harry giggles and says, “Charlie bit my finger." He offers his finger again and this time Charlie bites it with a little more force. Origin Protocol, a platform dedicated to NFT sales will conduct the auction and as per the official auction website, the winner will also get to shoot a parody of the video with Harry and Charlie.

According to the official auction website, the video has been a huge part of the Davies-Carr family’s lives for the past 14 years, and they are excited to welcome others to become a part of their story.

NFTs have become a huge trend this year and several digital art pieces, including memes, collectables and gifs being bought at high prices. Recently Streetwear fashion label Overpriced designed a virtual black hoodie inscribed with an expletive-laden logo that was sold on the digital art marketplace Blockparty to an anonymous bidder for £19,000.

RELATED STORIES

Last month, Zoe Roth, famously known as ‘Disaster Girl’, made almost half a million dollars after she sold the original photograph of the viral meme. NFTs are unique digital assets encrypted with an artist’s digital signature, verifying its ownership and authenticity, allowing digital content to be sold as physical art. By selling it, the owner doesn’t lose the rights as NFT retains copyright. Each time, the ‘Disaster Girl’ is re-sold in the future, Zoe will get 10% of the sale giving her control over the image for the first time in 15 years.

What can be an NFT? Well - at this point we’re more like to ask, what can’t be an NFT? Elon Musk may have opted out, but the curve is just starting - the first NFT artwork to be auctioned, the first Oscar-nominated movie to be released as an NFT, the first tweet by Jack Dorsey, the first NFT album. After art and auction houses, (and billionaires) news organizations and galleries also seem to be joining in on the trend. Quartz has converted an article into an NFT, a digital asset that essentially serves as its own certificate of ownership and authenticity. They’re, however, not the first. Associated Press sold its non-fungible token artwork on March 11 for a hefty sum only eight days putting it up for auction. And now there may be a TikTok being sold as an NFT. The viral video star Nathan Apodaca is listing his popular skateboarding TikTok as a non-fungible token, with bids starting at $500,000. If the name Nathan Apodaca doesn’t ring a bell, his viral video will - in the 23-second long TikTok posted in Sept. 2020, Apodaca (aka @420doggface208) lazily skateboards down an empty street while drinking Ocean Spray cran-raspberry juice and lip-syncing to Fleetwood Mac’s 1977 song “Dreams."

Read all the Latest News, Breaking News and Coronavirus News here

first published:May 19, 2021, 07:27 IST