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Watch: Flight Attendant Raps Safety Instructions on US Flight, Passengers Beatbox Along

Watch: Flight Attendant Raps Safety Instructions on US Flight, Passengers Beatbox Along

Adele is an employee with Southwest Airlines and was on a flight from Los Angeles heading to Salt Lake City, Utah, when she decided to rap her way through the safety instructions.

  • News18.com
  • Last Updated: April 9, 2019, 12:08 PM IST
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Many would agree that listening to by-the-book flight attendants drone safety instructions on airplanes is absolutely one of the most boring things to sit through. Though they are a compulsory part of safe air-travel, passengers often tend to lose interest as frequent fliers have it memorized by heart already and others are just not interested in the dull display.

But an air hostess in a US based airline has found an innovative and funky new way to do the boring yet essential safety announcements. On a recent flight, the flight-attendant, who goes by the name of Adele, took up the microphone right before take-off and instead of doing the usual routine, she rapped the instructions, in true hip-hop style.

Adele is an employee with Southwest Airlines and was on a flight from Los Angeles heading to Salt Lake City, Utah, Daily Mail reported.

A video of the "safety instructions rap" was recorded by one of the passengers and the "performance" has since been going viral on social media.

Many wondered why it had taken so long for someone to come up with a way to jazz up (or, as in this case, beatbox it up) the often lifesaving yet insanely dull safety instructions.



However, this is not at all new for Southwest Airlines who have had flight attendants rap safety instructions from way back in 2012-13.


Apparently, the rapping flight-attendants are part of the airline's overall attempt to make flying a 'fun' experience for passengers. As per a 2013 article in the US business magazine Fast Company, these initiatives and gimmicks helped Southwest become one of the most profitable airlines in the country, raking in profits for consecutive 40 years, even as other airlines struggled.

With Gully Boy fever spreading in India, we sure would like to see some of that action on Indian airlines too. As long as the pilot is safely in the cockpit, away from all the distractions.

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