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Watch: How the World's Last Male White Rhino Was Being Protected 24*7

Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhino, age 45, died at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya on March 19.

Anurag Verma | CNN-News18@kitAnurag

Updated:March 20, 2018, 5:47 PM IST
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Watch: How the World's Last Male White Rhino Was Being Protected 24*7
Photo credits: Julian Dutton @JulianDutton1 | Twitter
The world's last male northern white rhino has sadly vanished from the face of the earth.

"It is with great sadness that Ol Pejeta Conservancy and the Dvůr Králové Zoo announce that Sudan, the world's last male northern white rhino, age 45, died at Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya on March 19, 2018," Ol Pejeta said in a statement.

Sudan was being treated for age-related complications that had affected his muscles and bones and also gave him extensive skin wounds.

But did you know, the rhino had been put under 24-hour armed guard in the Kenya game conservancy where he breathed his last?




According to a report in The Independent, Sudan was not only fitted with radio transmitters but also had his horn removed for added precaution from poachers.

"The only reason his horn has been cut off is to deter poachers. If the rhino has no horn, he is of no interest to poachers. This is purely to keep him safe," Elodie Sampere of the conservancy told The Dodo.




The guards who protected the only male rhino weren't safe from poachers either.

“With the rising demand for rhino horn and ivory, we face many poaching attempts and while we manage to counter a large number of these, we often risk our lives in the line of duty," Irungu told the website World of Animals, reported The Huffington Post.

In fact, a GoFundMe campaign was launched by Ol Pejeta in 2015 to provide their rangers with the best possible training and equipment.

Watch the video here:



Despite their best efforts, the rhino couldn't be saved.

"His condition worsened significantly in the last 24 hours; he was unable to stand up and was suffering a great deal," Ol Pejeta said. "The veterinary team from the Dver Kralove Zoo, Ol Pejeta and Kenya Wildlife Service made the decision to euthanise him."

After all attempts at getting him to mate naturally failed, conservationists last year put Sudan on dating app Tinder, hoping to raise enough money to pay for a $9 million fertility treatment.

(Inputs from Reuters)

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