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'Weight Loss For Women, Bikes For Men': Edinburgh Dad Shares Photo of Math Homework Promoting Stereotypes

The questions especially seemed like reinforcing stereotypes sexism because the ones describing men had referred to them as doing exercises or buying bikes. (Crredit: twitter/William Sutcliffe)

The questions especially seemed like reinforcing stereotypes sexism because the ones describing men had referred to them as doing exercises or buying bikes. (Crredit: twitter/William Sutcliffe)

Sutcliffe's post received several supportive comments where parents expressed their dismay at the questions and some also gave other examples of how they have seen such casual sexism being part of normal school culture.

A set of homework questions for school kids on mathematical calculations have left a bad taste in the mouth for several parents after the questions involved seemed to reinforce casual sexist mindset with women shown going to spa breaks or calculating weight loss while the men did sit-ups.

William Sutcliffe, 49, from Edinburgh in Scotland took to his Twitter handle to share the problematic questions' sheet. Sutcliffe said that the “curriculum for excellence” maths homework is used throughout Scotland. He also said how the questions left his wife unimpressed, reported Daily Mail.

The questions especially seemed like reinforcing stereotypes sexism because the ones describing men had referred to them as doing exercises or buying bikes. Sutcliffe's post received a lot of support online by many other parents who accused the school of trying to normalise stoic sexism for children to pick up at a young age.

A children's author by profession, Sutcliffe shared the post on Twitter:

'My daughter's "curriculum for excellence" maths homework (used throughout Scotland) features sums about women going on spa breaks and calculating weight loss; men buying bikes and doing sit-ups. Very unimpressed wife has changed the names on the worksheet.'

Sutcliffe's wife, he said had then made changes on the sheet, which he shared online where she changed several of the names, such as changing 'Arnie' for 'Annie' and 'Dara' for 'Diana'.

Sutcliffe's post received several supportive comments where parents expressed their dismay at the questions and some also gave other examples of how they have seen such casual sexism being part of normal school culture.

Some of the questions included, "Ellie weighed 85 kilograms. She went to a health resort for a week and lost 20% of her weight." or "Abbie had £220. She spent 25% on a weekend spa break."

A few users however said that this may not have been the school's fault but parents should take it up with the publishers.

"’m afraid schools can’t afford to keep changing resources each year because they don’t reflect the ever changing status of society. Maths books are merely a tool used to ensure a concept, taught in an active, practical way, has been understood by the individual," said one user.

TeeJay Publications, who printed the book, took to Twitter and replied to Sutcliffe's post, promising to look into the matter.

Some even pointed out the weight loss question, and said how it is even aimed at promoting disturbing standards of beauty amid a rise in eating disorders among growing people.