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What Are The Types of Injections? Why They Are Administered in Different Parts of Body

By: Buzz Staff

Local News Desk

Last Updated: June 29, 2022, 12:26 IST

SCs are injected into the innermost layer of the skin called the subcutis or hypodermis, which is made up of a network of fat and collagen cells.

SCs are injected into the innermost layer of the skin called the subcutis or hypodermis, which is made up of a network of fat and collagen cells.

When we talk about different types of injections, we are referring to the body tissue or path where they are injected.

An injection is a way to inject a liquid into a person using a needle or a syringe. It is more commonly known as a jab or a shot around the world. There is a wide variety of medications that can be injected into the body through an injection, but then why are they not injected in the same place? Why do different medications have to be administered in different places of the body using different types of injections?

When we talk about different types of injections, we are referring to the body tissue or path where they are injected.

The most common types of injections are:

Intravenous or IV

They are the fastest way to inject medicine and involve using a syringe to inject it directly into the vein. They include medicines that are needed immediately such as pain killers, antibiotics, or antifungal agents such as morphine.

Intramuscular or IM

These are administered deep into the muscle where the medicine can be absorbed quickly by surrounding blood vessels. An example of it is the Covid-19 vaccines. The blood in the muscles keeps flowing in a fast stream, which helps the IM injections to transport the liquid throughout the body at a constant speed. Because of this more quantity of medicine can be given because the flow of blood is faster.

Subcutaneous or SC

SCs are injected into the innermost layer of the skin called the subcutis or hypodermis, which is made up of a network of fat and collagen cells. These work slower than IV or IM injections because the area does not have such a rich blood supply. A prime example of this is insulin that is given to a diabetic patient. The injections do not require a long needle as they only need to pass through the fatty tissue of the inner skin layer.

Intradermal or ID

These injections are given directly into the middle layer of the skin called the dermis. They absorb the slowest when compared to the rest of the aforementioned injections. They are not meant to deliver medicine or supplements and are only 1 inch long so they can tear the body to some extent.

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first published:June 29, 2022, 12:21 IST
last updated:June 29, 2022, 12:26 IST