Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
»
3-min read

Why Trolling Priyanka Chopra for Blouse-Less Saree is a Symbol of Colonial Hangover

It can very well be said that the blouse was Britain's most powerful export to India, one that outlived the influence of the crown and turned into sanskar.

Adrija Bose | News18.com

Updated:June 7, 2019, 7:56 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Why Trolling Priyanka Chopra for Blouse-Less Saree is a Symbol of Colonial Hangover
Credits: Priyanka Chopra | @glamouralertofficial / Instagram.
Loading...

If we could give a word of advice to trolls, it would be: READ.

The latest obsession of Internet's women body police is Priyanka Chopra's no blouse show on a magazine cover. Well, India's unemployment rate has gone up from four percent to 7.6 in the last two years (Just saying). The Bollywood actor turned singer turned Hollywood star draped a golden saree designed by Tarun Tahiliani for a US magazine cover. The writing on the magazine cover is in bold: "It's getting hot". Chopra posted the photo on Instagram and said, "I love how I feel when I’m wearing one," calling saree "the most iconic and recognized silhouettes from India".

All hell broke loose soon after. Instagrammers gathered to give Chopra some lessons on sanskar. "You look fabulous in saree but the way you are wearing is not related to our culture," wrote one user. "Kuch toh saram karo es desh ki," wrote another one. One user called her 'The uncultured Indian' and another one wrote "It is ok if you cannot make us proud! at least don't represent our culture in this dirty way! Shaeme on you!" Well, shame that he couldn't spell shame right.

Now while the word 'culture' featured many times on the comment section, it seems the 'gramers hardly knew of Indian culture otherwise surely they would have known that the blouse is a British import. At the same time when women in Bengal walked around without a blouse, European ladies laced themselves tight in corsets and dresses that covered them neck to toe. It may have turned into a symbol of sanskar, but the fact is that piece of clothing wasn't a part of Indian culture till a woman, Jnanadanandini Debi, popularised the idea of blouse just so that Indian women can enter clubs under the Raj.

And it was all because Jnanadanandini Debi, the wife of Satyendranath Tagore, was refused entry to clubs run by the British in India, for covering her breasts with her saree alone. Just to gain entry to those clubs, she decided to don the blouse under the saree. She went around promoting the concept covering the breasts through the use of various fabrics that soon caught on and turned into a fashion.

Meanwhile, in Kerala, the covering of breasts was closely tied to caste, and lower caste women were forbidden from covering their breasts, until the Channar Revolt which granted them the right to do so.

In India, there were no written codes of conduct or any laws to define the clothes that should be worn. Whatever was convenient, became the attire. In fact, sculptures from the Maury and Sunga periods (about 300 BC) reveal that men and women alike wore rectangular pieces of fabric, one on the lower part of the body and one on the upper part-- and that was pretty much it. Sculptures from the Gupta period showed that it was pretty normal for women to go topless. No one would complain about culture being ruined.

It can very well be said that the blouse was Britain's most powerful export to India, one that outlived the influence of the crown and turned into sanskar.

Angrez chale gaye, par trolls chhod gaye.

Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
  • 01 d
  • 12 h
  • 38 m
  • 09 s
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results