Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
News18 » Buzz
1-min read

Worm Species Which Has 3 Sexes and Thrives in High Arsenic Zone Discovered in California

They survive in the bottom of the ocean, the Antarctic tundra and even under the Earth's surface.

Trending Desk

Updated:October 1, 2019, 6:16 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Worm Species Which Has 3 Sexes and Thrives in High Arsenic Zone Discovered in California
Representative Image.

A new species of worm, which can survive 500 times the dose of arsenic taken to kill a human, has been discovered. The worm, which keeps its young in a pouch, similar to a kangaroo, has three different sexes.

CNN reported that researchers think humans might have something to learn from the worm's resilience.

Caltech researchers discovered eight species of worms that live in the arsenic-rich Mono lake in California. The team published its findings in the journal Current Biology.

Mono Lake is three times saltier than the Pacific Ocean. In fact, it is so salty, researchers said, that only two other species were ever known to live in it: brine shrimp and diving flies.

This is before they discovered this new species of worm.

CNN further reported that all the eight of the worms are unique — some are predators, some are parasites. Others nosh on microbes in the lake. However, they're all extremophiles. Extremophiles are organisms that thrive in severe conditions that most species couldn't survive in.

The California lake is just one of several extreme locales where researchers have spotted nematodes, the phylum all eight worm species belong to. They survive in the bottom of the ocean, the Antarctic tundra and even under the Earth's surface.

The researchers posited that nematodes might be genetically predisposed to thrive in extreme conditions. It would be a breakthrough in human health to learn more about the factors that keep them alive in harsh environments.

Arsenic, a toxin that occurs naturally in the Earth's crust, seeps into water sources worldwide and can poison those who drink it when levels are high. So understanding the biology behind these steely worms could help researchers understand how toxins affect the human body, co-author James Siho Lee said in a statement.

"The next innovation for biotechnology could be out there in the wild," CNN quoted him say. "We have to protect and responsibly utilize wildlife."

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results