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Despite Cyclone, Nipah Hurdles, Govt Worked To Fulfil Promises: Kerala CM Says in First Progress Report

File photo of Kerala CM Pinarayi Vijayan.

File photo of Kerala CM Pinarayi Vijayan.

The 178-page report tracks the progress of work done by the government when the LDF came to power in May 2016 till May 23 this year.

Thiruvananthapuram: On completion of three years, the Left Democratic Front (LDF)-led Kerala Government on Monday released a progress report, meant to provide citizens with the number of accomplished promises it had listed out in the election manifesto.

Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan released the progress report by handing over a copy to Speaker P Sreeramakrishnan at a function held in Thiruvananthapuram.

The 178-page report tracks the progress of work done between the start of the government in May 2016 till May 23 this year. In the introductory note, Vijayan spoke about the challenges that the government faced in the last one year.

The report read, “The government had come face to face with many things unexpected in this time period. If the Ockhi cyclone wreaked havoc off Kerala coast, the Nipah virus spread too reared its ugly head during the past one year. In the third year of our governance had Kerala witnessed the worst flood of a century. In the same year, implementation of Goods and Services Tax (GST) and demonetisation took place. Facing all those obstacles the government worked towards realising the promises made to people.”

The report also mentioned the immediate steps taken after the massive flood last year and the efforts at rebuilding the state. Besides, it furnished the speech delivered by the chief minister at the World Reconstruction Conference held in Geneva in 2019.

The report said that in its multi-pointed strategies to rebuild Kerala, the government had tried to take nature and geographical peculiarities into consideration for a better future.

Public opinion and feedback on the report would be accepted over email and postal letters.