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Kali Puja 2019: Why Bengal Celebrates the Angry Indian Goddess on Amavasya

Kali Puja 2019: Why Bengal Celebrates the Angry Indian Goddess on Amavasya

Goddess Kali is considered as the first incarnation of Goddess Durga and is considered a more fierce and aggressive form of Durga.

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When North India celebrates Diwali to commemorate Lord Ram’s return to Ayodhya after his fourteen years of banishment, Bengalis, Odia and Assamese across the country celebrate Kali Puja. Kali puja, as the name suggests, is celebrated to worship Goddess Kali.

In Bengal, the Sharodotsab or the autumn festival ends with Kali Puja. Wherein Durga Puja, the ten-handed deity is the goddess of protection and progression; Kali is the goddess of destruction, the other side of the cycle of the creation concerning cosmic law of constant transformation. In fact, it’s also believed that Kali was born from Durga’s forehead to save heaven and earth from cruel demons.

Kali is considered as the first incarnation of Goddess Durga and is considered a more fierce and aggressive form of Durga. The ferocious Goddess is depicted with disheveled hair, wearing a garland of skulls and holding a demon’s head in one hand and a weapon on the other.

For Kali Puja, the devotees observe a very strict fast, without drinking water. They break the fast after the puja ceremony. Hibiscus is an important flower for Kali Puja as it’s regarded as her favourite flower. As part of bhog, she is also offered rice, lentils, and sweets.

The Amavasya tithi (timing) is an important period for the Kali Puja. This year the following is the time to observe the puja and pray to the Goddess. (Source: DrikPanchang)

Amavasya Tithi Begins - 12:23 PM on Oct 27, 2019

Amavasya Tithi Ends - 09:08 AM on Oct 28, 2019


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