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Monsoon Deficit Continues as July Rains Ditch North and East India

The cumulative rainfall in June stood at 155.3 mm—a departure of 5 per cent from the normal of 163.6 mm—however, in July, the figure further slumped to 16 per cent than the normal downpour.

Mayank Mohanti | News18.com

Updated:July 13, 2018, 9:08 AM IST
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Monsoon Deficit Continues as July Rains Ditch North and East India
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While the southwest monsoon failed to impress in the first month, it continues to remain a total disappointment as it has failed to pick up even after a dozen days into the next month.

The cumulative rainfall in June stood at 155.3 mm — a departure of 5 per cent from the normal of 163.6 mm — however, in July, the figure further slumped to 16 per cent than the normal downpour.

Patna has so far received only 68.6 mm rain against the normal of 241.9 mm, with a departure of minus 72 per cent; last week, the departure exceeded to 87 per cent. Respite seems to be at a distance since the meteorological department has forecast dry weather for another five days.



Similarly, Ranchi and Lucknow too had a dry spell last week with the rainfall departure being 72 per cent and 100 per cent respectively. Gandhinagar, the capital of Gujarat, witnessed only 13.5 mm rainfall, a departure of 81 per cent from the normal. Overall, the capital city has had a downpour of 41.5 mm, which is 77 per cent less than the normal monsoon rain. In the next two to three days, the maximum temperatures in these regions are likely to increase. This is likely to result in discomfort as the regions are also dealing with high humidity levels.



Overall, the country is witnessing a rainfall deficit of 9 per cent in the season. Uttar Pradesh and Gujarat have received just about half the normal rain, whereas the east and north east India have witnessed a departure of 27 per cent. The Southern Peninsula has been graced with bountiful rains, with Tamil Nadu and Telangana receiving more than 30 per cent than the normal downpour.



The monsoon season is in a crucial phase since most of the summer (kharif) crop sowing takes place in July. Its deficiency—a third of the 36 meteorological subdivisions show deficient rainfall—have led to the decrease in sowing of crops.

According to a government figure, the sowing of kharif crops have been 10 per cent less than the average and 14 per cent less than last year; paddy, which requires more water, stood at 21 per cent below normal.

IMD officials have attributed the deficiency in monsoon to a lack of activity in the Bay of Bengal. They, however, predicted that a low pressure area is very likely to form over north Bay of Bengal and neighbourhood during next 24 hours.

It further predicted that the ongoing active monsoon conditions are very likely to continue over central India and south Peninsula during next 4-5 days. Rainfall activity is likely to increase over parts of northwest India from today. Subdued rainfall activity is likely to continue over East and Northeast India during next 2-3 days.

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| Edited by: Parth Sharma
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