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MS Swaminathan's Birthday: Factors That Led to Green Revolution in India

File photo of MS Swaminathan.

File photo of MS Swaminathan.

After the Green Revolution in India, there was an increase in agricultural production. Employment opportunities also increased after the Green Revolution in India.

A set of research technology transfer initiatives occurred between the 1950s and the late 1960s, that increased agricultural production around the world is generally termed as the Green Revolution. In India, Green Revolution refers to a period when Indian agriculture was converted into an industrial system by the adoption of modern methods of farming like tractors, irrigation facilities, pesticides, and fertilizer and technology like the use of HYV (high yielding variety) seeds.

A part of a larger initiative by Norman Borlaug, Green Revolution in India was founded by M S Swaminathan. The aim was to increase agricultural productivity in the developing world with use of technology and agricultural research. In fact, for his contributions to the world food supply, Borlaug was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1970.

Green revolution was based as new technology, new ideas, and new application of inputs like HYV seeds, fertilizers, irrigation water, and pesticides among others. Since all these brought sudden reformation in agricultural practices and spread quickly to attain dramatic results thus, it is termed as revolution in green agriculture.

One of the major milestones in the Green Revolution in India were the development of high-yielding varieties of wheat and rust resistant strains of wheat, while the high yielding varieties programme was constrained to only 5 crops - wheat, rice, jowar, maize, and bajra

After the Green Revolution in India, there was an increase in agricultural production. Employment opportunities also increased after the Green Revolution in India.

Several problems were addressed through Green Revolution in India, which includes:

Frequent famines

Lack of finance

Lack of self-sufficiency

Notably, the Green Revolution within India commenced in the early 1960s that led to an increase in food grain production, especially in Punjab, Haryana, and Uttar Pradesh.

first published:August 07, 2019, 11:20 IST