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Not Everyone is Doctorate in Urdu, Persian: Delhi HC Orders Police to Lodge FIRs in Simple Language

File photo of Delhi High Court (Picture courtesy: Getty Images)

File photo of Delhi High Court (Picture courtesy: Getty Images)

The Delhi High Court has taken it upon itself to ensure that the Delhi Police do away with usage of these words 'mechanically' without knowing the exact meanings themselves and requiring everyone to consult dictionaries.

Utkarsh Anand
  • CNN-News18
  • Last Updated: November 27, 2019, 10:01 AM IST
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New Delhi: Around 400 incomprehensible Urdu and Persian words in FIRs could very soon become a thing of the past in Delhi.

The Delhi High Court has taken it upon itself to ensure that the Delhi Police do away with usage of these words "mechanically" without knowing the exact meanings themselves and requiring everyone to consult dictionaries.

A bench headed by Chief Justice DN Patel has ordered Delhi Police to stop flaunting their knowledge of Urdu and Pesian, and start recording FIRs in simple and plain language for everyone to understand. It held that police officers are working for the common public at large and not always for those who are Doctorate degree holders in Urdu, Hindi or Persian languages.

After it sought an explanation from the Commissioner, a circular has been issued by the Deputy Commissioner of Police, Legal Cell, on November 20, asking all police officials in Delhi to use simple and comprehensible words while registering FIRs instead of Urdu and Persian ones.

A list of 383 Urdu and Persian words along with their translations in Hindi and English was also submitted before the High Court on Monday.

HC sample

A sample FIR submitted in the high court shows the convoluted vocabulary.

The court took on record this list and maintained that since FIR is the most crucial document that sets the process of criminal justice in motion, it must be recorded in simplest possible language and preferably in the words of the complainant.

"There is no need for the police to show their knowledge of Urdu and Persian words, and use them mechanically without even knowing the exact meanings. Moreover, public at large may not be able to understand all these Urdu and Persian words," said the High Court in its order.

The court directed that the "the practice of using these words in the FIRs ought to be stopped by the police”.

The court has now directed the Commissioner to produce 10 FIRs each from 10 different police stations of Delhi — a total of 100 FIRs — on the next date of hearing so as to show that the circular is being followed in the letter and spirit.

The bench added that henceforth, the police must also give to all complainants and informants the list of 383 words with their translations in Hindi and English so that they know what has been finally recorded in the FIRs is the correct version of the incident.

The court order has come on a petition moved by one Vishalakshi Goel, who had pointed out how the Delhi Police was using Urdu and Persian words routinely without knowing the exact meanings and making it extremely difficult for the complainant to understand it.

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