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SC Fines Ayurveda Doctor Rs 10,000 for Claiming He Has Developed Cure for Covid-19

File photo of The Supreme Court of India. (Image Credit: PTI)

File photo of The Supreme Court of India. (Image Credit: PTI)

The bench, headed by Justice Sanjay K Kaul, took a grim view of such unsubstantiated claims and wastage of judicial time.

An ayurveda doctor has been fined Rs 10,000 by the Supreme Court for claiming he has discovered a treatment for COVID-19.

Haryana-based Omprakash Vaid Gyantara incurred strong displeasure of the top court when he sought a direction that his medicine must be used by all doctors, hospitals across the country.

The PIL by Gyantara, who held a degree of Bachelor of Ayurvedic Medicine and Surgery (BAMS), had asked the court to order the Secretary, Health Department, Government of India, to use the medicines made by him for treating COVID-19.

The plea claimed Gyantara has some cure for deadly infection in the form of a desi version of the medicine. The bench, headed by Justice Sanjay K Kaul, took a grim view of such unsubstantiated claims and the very filing of such a PIL in the apex court.

It was of the view that the direction sought in Gyantara's PIL were completely misconceived and that it was time to send a message that people should not approach a court with such contentions.

The bench, which also had Justices Ajay Rastogi and Aniruddha Bose, further noted that the primary consideration of the petitioner in filing such a petition seemed to be getting some attention and publicity.

"We are of the view that such kind of petitions must be stopped as anybody and everybody thinks they have some cure for the situation," it maintained.

The court, in its order on Thursday, added that such petitioners seek to invoke the jurisdiction of this Court under Article 32 of the Constitution, possibly only to gain some publicity.

"Such wastage of judicial time is completely inappropriate," held the bench. It then dismissed the writ petition with cost of Rs 10,000 to be deposited by Gyantara with the Supreme Court Advocates-on-Record Welfare Fund within four weeks.

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