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Uttarakhand Farmer's Tallest Corriander Plant Earns Him Place in Guinness Book of World Records

The height of Gopal Upreti's coriander plant is 7 feet 1 inch. (News18)

The height of Gopal Upreti's coriander plant is 7 feet 1 inch. (News18)

The Guinness World Records wrote, “The tallest coriander plant is 2.16 m (7 ft 1 in) and was grown by Gopal Upreti (India) in Ranikhet, Uttarkahand, as measured on 21 April, 2020.”

A farmer in Uttarakhand has earned a place in the Guinness Book of World Records by growing a coriander plant at a height of 7 feet 1 inch.

Gopal Upreti who has an organic farm at Ranikhet in Almora district said he has been officially communicated the message from global record-keeping body.

In its website, the Guinness World Records wrote, “The tallest coriander plant is 2.16 m (7 ft 1 in) and was grown by Gopal Upreti (India) in Ranikhet, Uttarkahand, as measured on 21 April, 2020.” The earlier record was 5 feet and 9 inches.

Upreti said he started growing coriander in half an acre piece of land in October last year and the yield was overwhelming.

The average height of coriander plants in his farm was more than 5 feet and one of them crossed 7-feet mark.

“To be honest, I did not grow coriander for making a record. I posted a picture of the huge plant on Facebook and one user suggested that I should approach Guinness Records and this is how it all happened,” Upreti told News18.

“I surfed the internet and approached the Guinness only when I was convinced that no one else has grown such a tall plant”.

The farmer said a team from the state agriculture department has also recorded the height of his plant and gave him a certificate.

Besides coriander, Upreti grows turmeric, apples and other vegetables. He says organic farming has a huge scope, particularly in hill states.

Known as a progressive farmer in Uttarakhand, Upreti urged fellow agriculturists to focus on organic farming as the demand for pesticide-free produce has grown manifold after the COVID-19 pandemic.