Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
News18 » India
1-min read

'Need to Revive Traditional Sources': Union Minister Warns Water Shortage May Cut India's Food Exports

From being a food-deficit country, India had achieved the distinction of being a top exporter of food but to retain that edge it needed to revive its reservoirs, lakes and other traditional water bodies, said water resources minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat,

Reuters

Updated:June 24, 2019, 8:17 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
'Need to Revive Traditional Sources': Union Minister Warns Water Shortage May Cut India's Food Exports
Representative image.

New Delhi: A water shortage could cut food exports from India, a leading supplier of a number of food products to the world, Union water resources minister Gajendra Singh Shekhawat warned on Monday.

From being a food-deficit country, India had achieved the distinction of being a top exporter of food but to retain that edge it needed to revive its reservoirs, lakes and other traditional water bodies, Shekhawat said in a statement. "Judicious use of water can save India from future calamities," Shekhawat said.

India, a leading producer of an array of food commodities, is sitting on large stockpiles of rice, wheat and sugar. It emerged as the world’s biggest rice exporter in 2012, selling nearly 12 million tonnes of the staple annually on the world market, including 4 million tonnes of the aromatic basmati variety, exclusively grown in India and Pakistan.

But rice is a water-intensive crop. Government research bodies and experts say Indian farmers need 4,500 to 5,000 litres of water to grow one kg of rice.

Water is typically scarce in the summer months, but the situation has been particularly grim this year in western and southern states that received below average rainfall in the 2018 monsoon season. This year, the monsoon has delivered 38% lower-than normal, or average, rainfall since the start of the season on June 1, according to data compiled by the state-run India Meteorological Department.

After a weak start, monsoon rains, that water half of the country's farmlands lacking irrigation, have covered nearly half of the country and conditions are favourable for further advances into the central and western parts this week, a weather department official said on Monday.

India’s water demand is projected to be double its supply by 2030, the National Institute for Transforming India (NITI) Aayog said in a report last year.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results