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'Why Use Urdu, Persian in FIRs?': Court Pulls up Delhi Police for 'Bombastic Words, Flowery Language'

The court directed the Police Commissioner to file an affidavit explaining whether Urdu or Persian words are used by the agency or the complainant and listed the matter for further hearing on November 25.

PTI

Updated:August 7, 2019, 11:32 PM IST
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'Why Use Urdu, Persian in FIRs?': Court Pulls up Delhi Police for 'Bombastic Words, Flowery Language'
File photo of Delhi High Court (Picture courtesy: Getty Images)
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New Delhi: The Delhi High Court on Wednesday directed the Delhi Police Commissioner to explain why Urdu or Persian terms are used in a FIR when the same are not used by the complainant, saying that simple language should be used instead of "high sounding" and "bombastic" words.

A bench of Chief Justice DN Patel and Justice C Hari Shankar told the Delhi Police that FIRs should be in the words of the complainant and too much flowery language, the meaning of which has to be discerned from a dictionary, ought not to be used.

The court said the police is there to work for the public at large and not just for persons who have a doctorate degree in Urdu or Persian.

"Too much flowery language, the meaning of which is to be found out by a dictionary, should not be used. An FIR should be in the words of the complainant. The police is there for public at large and not just for persons with doctorate degree in Urdu or Persian. Simple language should be used, instead of high-sounding words. People have to know what is written. It is applicable to use of English also. Don't use bombastic language," the bench told the Delhi Police.

The court directed the Police Commissioner to file an affidavit explaining whether Urdu or Persian words are used by the agency or the complainant and listed the matter for further hearing on November 25.

The court was hearing a PIL by advocate Vishalakshi Goel seeking directions to the Delhi Police not to use Urdu and Persian words in FIRs.

Delhi government additional standing counsel Naushad Ahmed Khan, appearing for the police, said Urdu and Persian words used in FIRs can be understood by making a little effort. He added that the words are used when transferring the FIR to the higher authorities.

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