Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
CO-PRESENTED BY
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
» »
1-min read

Try Green Tea to Fight Bone Marrow Disorders

A compound found in green tea could have life saving potential for patients who face often-fatal medical complications associated with bone marrow disorders, says a study.

Reuters

Updated:February 7, 2017, 4:11 PM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Try Green Tea to Fight Bone Marrow Disorders
Representative image
A compound found in green tea could have life saving potential for patients who face often-fatal medical complications associated with bone marrow disorders, says a study.

The compound epigallocatechine-3-gallate (EGCG), a polyphenol found in green tea leaves, may be of particular benefit to patients struggling with multiple myeloma and amyloidosis - both related to bone marrow disorders, according to the researchers.

Patinets with multiple myeloma and amyloidosis are susceptible to a frequently fatal condition called light chain amyloidosis, in which parts of the body's own antibodies become misshapen and can accumulate in various organs, including the heart and kidneys.

"The idea here is twofold: We wanted to better understand how light chain amyloidosis works, and how the green tea compound affects this specific protein," said Jan Bieschke, Assistant Professor at Washington University in St. Louis.

Bieschke's team first isolated individual light chains from nine patients with bone marrow disorders that caused multiple myeloma or amyloidosis, then ran lab experiments to determine how the green tea compound affected the light chain protein.

In bone marrow patients, the findings published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry showed that the green tea compound transformed light chain amyloid, preventing the misshapen form from replicating and accumulating dangerously.

"In the presence of green tea, the chains have a different internal structure," Bieschke said.
| Edited by: Manila Venugopal
Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
 
 

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
  • 01 d
  • 12 h
  • 38 m
  • 09 s
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results