Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English

Fall in Platelet Count May No Longer Remain the Telling Symptom of Dengue

Dubbed as the 'break bone fever' or 'dandy fever', symptoms of dengue fever include severe joint and muscle pain, swollen lymph nodes, headache, fever, exhaustion and rashes.

Trending Desk

Updated:October 28, 2019, 12:33 PM IST
facebookTwitter Pocket whatsapp
Fall in Platelet Count May No Longer Remain the Telling Symptom of Dengue
News18 creative by Mir Suhail.

A major symptom of dengue is the receding platelet count. However, after five reported cases in Kolkata, the telling symptom in dengue may no longer be true. In all these cases, doctors realised the platelet counts were at a safe level -- stoking suspicions over the changing character of the dengue virus.

Dengue is a viral infection which typically appears during the monsoon season. Dubbed as the “break bone fever” or “dandy fever”, symptoms of dengue fever include severe joint and muscle pain, swollen lymph nodes, headache, fever, exhaustion, and rash. The presence of fever, rash, and headache (the "dengue triad") is characteristic of dengue fever.

Dr Arindam Biswas, internal medicine specialist at RN Tagore International Institute of Cardiac Sciences, as quoted by the Times of India, said that in a majority of the dengue cases they have come across this year, patients had stable platelet count. He went on to add that every virus can change its character and when a mutated virus enters the body, the body mounts a severe inflammatory reaction to resist it, which may be counter-productive for the body.

Dr Biswas also pointed out that even if the platelet count is high, the platelets may not function normally. It is, therefore, pertinent that doctors look for signs of concurrent infection and investigate further.

Dr Prabhas Prasun Giri, in-charge of paediatric intensive care unit at Institute of Child Health, Kolkata said that this year they have come across four children suffering from dengue fever. The ferratin level in the children had shot-up dangerously and even though they lost one child, they were able to save the others.

“We had conducted a study few years ago on how serum ferratin can go haywire in dengue cases leading to multi organ dysfunction. While this can be tacked with a combination of steroid and IV immunoglobulin, doctors often tend to overlook this aspect,” Giri further added.

The report added that the platelet count of Ruhul Mallick, first dengue victim this year in Kolkata, was well within the safe zone. But his ferratin level had shot up to 44,000Ng/L against the normal mark of 500Ng/L.

Microbiologist Dr Bhaskar Narayan Chaudhury added that in each outbreak, the dengue virus tends to act differently and this time the platelet count does not seem to be a major problem.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

facebookTwitter Pocket whatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results