Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English

Maternal Vitamin A Deficiency May Increase Alzheimer's Risk in Babies

Babies whose mothers do not take adequate Vitamin A nutrients during their pregnancy may be at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even from the womb or just after birth, researchers have warned.

IANS

Updated:January 28, 2017, 5:59 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Maternal Vitamin A Deficiency May Increase Alzheimer's Risk in Babies
Image only for representational purpose.
Loading...

Babies whose mothers do not take adequate Vitamin A nutrients during their pregnancy may be at an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease, even from the womb or just after birth, researchers have warned.

The findings showed that even a mild Vitamin A deficiency increased the production of amyloid beta -- the protein that forms plaques that smother and ultimately kill neurons in Alzheimer's disease.

"Our study clearly shows that marginal deficiency of Vitamin A, even as early as in pregnancy, has a detrimental effect on brain development and has long-lasting effect that may facilitate Alzheimer's disease in later life," said Weihong Song, professor at University of British Columbia in Canada.

The study, published in Acta Neuropathologica, revealed that lack of Vitamin A also affected their cognitive abilities such as learning and memory.

Previous studies have linked low levels of Vitamin A with cognitive impairments.

For this research, the team examined the effects of Vitamin A deprivation in the womb and infancy on Alzheimer's model mice.

Even when the mice deprived of Vitamin A in the womb were given a normal diet as pups, they performed worse than mice who received a normal amount of the nutrient in the womb but were deprived after birth. In other words, the damage had already been done in the womb.

Yet, the study showed that some reversal is possible.

Mice who were deprived in utero but then given supplements immediately after birth performed better in the tests than mice who weren't given such supplements.

"In some cases, providing supplements to the newborn Alzheimer's disease model mice could reduce the amyloid beta level and improve learning and memory deficits," Song added.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Subscribe to Moneycontrol Pro and gain access to curated markets data, trading recommendations, equity analysis, investment ideas, insights from market gurus and much more. Get Moneycontrol PRO for 1 year at price of 3 months. Use code FREEDOM.

| Edited by: Gurleen Nagpal
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results