Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
CO-PRESENTED BY
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English

Slow Pace in Old Age May Indicate Heart Diseases

The study states that older adults with walking problems are at a higher risk of developing heart diseases.

IANS

Updated:November 21, 2017, 6:39 PM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Slow Pace in Old Age May Indicate Heart Diseases
(Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Lisa F Young/ shutterstock.com)
Loading...
Are you facing difficulty in taking rapid steps? Beware, it may indicate the risk of chronic heart illness.

Older adults with walking problems are at a higher risk of developing heart diseases, a new study says.

The study, published in the journal of the American Geriatrics Society, stated that the link between heart disease risk factors and walking difficulties was greater in people belonging to the older age group.

Aging enhances the problems of balance, muscle strength and flexibility, physical strength that could also lead to numerous limitations and disabilities.

Heart disease risk factors such as smoking, living with diabetes, obesity or being physically inactive were linked to having a slower walking speed, the researchers noted.

The study, led by Emerald G. Heiland, researcher at the Karolinska University in Sweden, studied over participants aged 60 and above. The participants neither had heart disease at the start of the study nor any problems with walking speed, balance or chair standing exercises.

Researchers considered participants' physical activity levels, alcohol consumption, body mass index and the cognitive abilities that helps to think and make decisions.

In addition, the blood levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) were also tested. High CRP levels point to a higher risk for heart diseases, which remains a serious concern for older people.

The results showed that the more risk factors people had for heart disease, the faster their decline in walking speed.

The researchers concluded that reducing heart disease risk factors with appropriate treatments might help "younger" older adults maintain their physical function.
| Edited by: Manila Venugopal
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
 
 

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
  • 01 d
  • 12 h
  • 38 m
  • 09 s
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results