Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App

Want to Learn Something? Sleep on it, But Not Too Deeply

According to a study, a human brain can learn only in certain phases of shut-eye.

AFP Relaxnews

Updated:August 9, 2017, 3:43 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Want to Learn Something? Sleep on it, But Not Too Deeply
(Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Eva-Katalin/ Istock.com)
Loading...

Scientists fascinated by the idea that humans might be able to learn while asleep -- a new language, say, or a piece of music -- have long been coming up with clashing experimental results.

On Tuesday, a team said it has finally unravelled why. The human brain can learn only in certain phases of shut-eye.

Participants in a study were able to memorise sound patterns played to them during two phases of sleep called Rapid Eye Movement (REM) and N2, researchers wrote in the journal Nature Communications.

REM is the phase of unconsciousness during which we typically dream, and is characterised, as its name suggests, by the eyes flitting about restlessly. N2 is a phase of lighter, non-REM sleep.

A third phase of deep non-REM sleep called N3, said the researchers, was positively bad for memory formation, however.

"Sounds previously learned during N2 sleep are forgotten or unlearned, as if erased from memory," the French team said in a statement.

They had wired 23 volunteers up to EEG brain monitors, and played them recordings of sound patterns while they slept.

When they awoke, the trial participants were tested on how well they could remember the simple compositions.

The team "observed a sharp distinction between light NREM sleep, during which learning was possible, and deep NREM sleep, during which learning was suppressed," said a press summary by the journal.

In fact, upon waking, the participants who unlearnt the sounds during N3 sleep found the same patterns even harder to relearn than to pick up completely new ones.

This supported theories that N3 sleep serves to unclutter the memory, said the researchers.

Further research must be done to determine how the findings may find practical application as a learning aid.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Subscribe to Moneycontrol Pro and gain access to curated markets data, trading recommendations, equity analysis, investment ideas, insights from market gurus and much more. Get Moneycontrol PRO for 1 year at price of 3 months. Use code FREEDOM.

| Edited by: Manila Venugopal
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results