Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
»
1-min read

Heart Attacks More Severe in Morning Than Night

The study, published in the journal Trends in Immunology, discusses how time of the day affects the severity of afflictions, ranging from allergies to heart attacks.

IANS

Updated:May 20, 2019, 10:47 AM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Heart Attacks More Severe in Morning Than Night
(Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ Tharakorn/ Istock.com)
Loading...

Heart attacks that mostly happen in the morning tend to be more severe than cardiac arrests at night, warn researchers.

The study, published in the journal Trends in Immunology, discusses how time of the day affects the severity of afflictions, ranging from allergies to heart attacks. For example, studies showed that adaptive immune responses — in which highly specialised, pathogen-fighting cells develop over weeks — are under circadian control.

Researchers compiled studies, predominantly in mice, that looked at the connection between circadian rhythms and immune responses. "This is 'striking' and should have relevance for clinical applications, from transplants to vaccinations," said study senior author Christoph Scheiermann, Professor at the University of Geneva in Switzerland.

According to researchers, in both humans and mice, the numbers of white blood cells also oscillate in a circadian manner, raising the question whether it might be possible one day to optimise immune response through awareness and utilisation of the circadian clock.

For the study, researchers looked into separate studies that compared immune cell time-of-day rhythms under normal conditions, inflammation and disease.

"Investigating circadian rhythms in innate and adaptive immunity is a great tool to generally understand the physiological interplay and time-dependent succession of events in generating immune responses," said Scheiermann.

"The challenge lies in how to channel our growing mechanistic understanding of circadian immunology into time-tailored therapies for human patients," Scheiermann remarked.

Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
 
 

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
  • 01 d
  • 12 h
  • 38 m
  • 09 s
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results