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Keratosis Pilaris: Everything You Need to Know About the Skin Disease Yami Gautam is Battling With

Yami Gautam is dealing with incurable skin condition that causes rough patches and small, acne-like bumps on the skin. (Images: Instagram/Shutterstock)

Yami Gautam is dealing with incurable skin condition that causes rough patches and small, acne-like bumps on the skin. (Images: Instagram/Shutterstock)

Keratosis pilaris is a condition that causes rough patches and small, acne-like bumps on the skin. Check out Symptoms, Do's and Don'ts about it

Bollywood Actress Yami Gautam revealed that she is suffering from a skin condition called Keratosis pilaris and further said that she developed the condition during her teenage years and that there is no cure for it. Here’s all you need to know about Keratosis pilaris:

What is Keratosis pilaris?

Seeking to conceal particular regions of the body and engaging in rigorous skin routines to minimize the harshness of the skin’s look is a daily occurrence for many individuals living with keratosis pilaris. It is a widespread skin condition that affects people of all ages. Keratosis pilaris is a benign disorder characterised by numerous tiny, rough, red, or pink blotches on the upper arms, calves, buttocks, and occasionally the face.

Keratosis pilaris gives the appearance of “goosebumps” or “chicken skin.” It may be unsightly, yet it is completely harmless medically. It is a frequent skin condition in otherwise healthy adults.

It is caused by an accumulation of keratin, a protein that shields the skin from infections and other hazardous substances. The accumulation develops a clog that obstructs the entrance of a hair follicle and as a result, these bumps are formed.

Symptoms

Patients with keratosis pilaris generally show a dispersed, patchy rash made up of extremely minute red or pink bumps. A fine sandpaper-like appearance is produced by tens to hundreds of extremely small mildly scratchy bumps. Some of the spots may be somewhat red or have a light-red halo around them, signaling inflammation.

While keratosis pilaris is not a serious illness, it may be aggravating, which often drives patients to seek a remedy. The good news is, it may heal in the summertime for some people, only to revert to normal in winter. What’s the bad news? Doctors claim there is no cure. This includes diets marketed as “wonder cures” that you may have found online. Nevertheless, there are some things you should and shouldn’t do to lessen its impact.

Do’s

It is generally beneficial to keep the skin moist (hydrated) and to use moderate, fragrance-free cleansers with regular moisturiser applications. Creams and ointments perform better than lotions as moisturisers, and they function best when used immediately after bathing when the skin will still be hydrated.

Don’ts

Scrubbing the lumps away with a pumice stone or other abrasive exfoliator can irritate the skin and aggravate the disease. Likewise, avoid scraping or poking at the bumps, since this might result in bacterial infections or scars.

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