Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English

Study Reveals Link Between Air Pollution and Increased Risk of Miscarriage

The study, led by researchers from the University of Utah in the US, shows that even a short-term exposure to air pollution elevated the risk of miscarriage by 16 per cent.

Updated:February 8, 2019, 6:07 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Study Reveals Link Between Air Pollution and Increased Risk of Miscarriage
Representative Photo Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ DragonImages/ Istock.com
Loading...

From asthma to pre-term birth, air pollution has been associated with numerous adverse health outcomes. Now a new study finds that air pollution can also increase the risk of miscarriage.

The study, led by researchers from the University of Utah in the US, shows that even a short-term exposure to air pollution elevated the risk of miscarriage by 16 per cent.

They also observed a slight increased risk (by 6 per cent) for those exposed to elevated levels of nitrogen dioxide.

"The results of this study are upsetting, and we need to work together as a society to find constructive solutions," said Matthew Fuller, senior author on the paper.

For the study, published in the journal, 'Fertility and Sterility,' the researchers surveyed more than 1,300 women in the average age group of 28 years from the Wasatch Front -- the most populous region in the US.

The team examined the risk of miscarriage during a three or seven-day period following a spike in the concentration of three common air pollutants -- small particulate matter (PM 2.5), nitrogen dioxide and ozone.

"We are really only seeing the most severe cases during a small window of time. These results are not the whole picture," said Claire Leiser, research analyst at the varsity.

Leiser notes the results suggest there could be an increased risk for an individual.

However, the scientists were unable to ascertain the age of the foetus at the time of the miscarriage and were unable to pinpoint a critical period when the foetus may be most vulnerable to pollutants.

Fuller recommends that women can manage the risk by using a N95 particulate respirator face mask to filter out pollutants or avoid outdoor physical activity on poor air quality days. They can also use filters to lower indoor pollution and, if possible, time conception to avoid seasonal episodes of poor air quality.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

| Edited by: Naqshib Nisar
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results