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To Tackle Kashmir Issue, India Must Understand Pak-China Dynamics: PDP Co-founder Muzaffar Baig

PDP co-founder and former deputy chief minister Muzaffar Baig on Viewpoint. (CNN-News18)

PDP co-founder and former deputy chief minister Muzaffar Baig on Viewpoint. (CNN-News18)

After Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti went public with her desire for tripartite talks between Jammu and Kashmir government, Centre and Pakistan, PDP co-founder and former deputy CM Muzaffar Baig said that both Centre and state do not know where the problem lies.

New Delhi: Kashmir is on the boil. Each day, stories of unrest are being reported from the valley.

After Chief Minister Mehbooba Mufti went public with her desire for tripartite talks between Jammu and Kashmir government, Centre and Pakistan, PDP co-founder and former deputy CM Muzaffar Baig said that both Centre and state do not know where the problem lies.

Mufti had on Monday said that talks are necessary "to end the bloodshed". She took to Twitter following the attacks on Sunjuwan Army camp in Jammu and a CRPF camp in Karan Nagar, Srinagar, and said, "Dialogue with Pakistan is necessary if we are to end bloodshed. I know I will be labelled anti-national by news anchors tonight but that doesn’t matter. The people of J&K are suffering. We have to talk because war is not an option."

Speaking on CNN-News18’s Viewpoint, Baig expressed his unhappiness with the way events have unfolded in Kashmir.

“The stakeholders both in Kashmir and the Centre actually don’t know what the real problem is. Pakistan is a proxy of China today. China has huge assets in that area. If India has to tackle Kashmir, first you have to understand the dynamics between Pakistan and China. It’s one of the important reasons why Srinagar is on the boil,” he said.

When asked if Mufti should step down, Baig said, “How will that lead to a solution? All stake holders are letting people of Kashmir down.”

When asked if the state had simply become unmanageable, Baig said, “When Mufti Muhammad Sayeed and I were managing affairs then no one said that the state was not manageable. Why are those questions being raised only now?”

As Kashmir continues to struggle from one crisis to the next, it’s this ambivalence of all stake holders involved which is most telling.