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Rohit Sharma Weighs in On Boundary Rule Controversy That Cost New Zealand the World Cup

Rohit Sharma Weighs in On Boundary Rule Controversy That Cost New Zealand the World Cup

Indian opener Rohit Sharma is the latest to join this outcry, signaling that there is an urgent need to revamp certain rules of cricket that, in this case, came at the heavy expense of New Zealand’s World Cup campaign.

England finally managed to uplift the curse of cricket deities by winning their first ever World Cup at Lord’s against New Zealand in a nerve-wrecking final replete with so many twists and turns – that it started to feel like a mass hyperventilation exercise after a point.

The victory by the never-seen-before margin based on ‘boundaries scored’ came after England and New Zealand were tied at the end of their respective 50 over innings and a penalty shootout-style super over also failed to separate them.

England’s magnificent stint this world cup notwithstanding, the fact that the hosts’ 24 boundaries compared to the Kiwi’s 17 was what clinched England’s victory however, has created an uproar in the cricket fraternity.

Fans, veterans and cricketers have unanimously criticised it and said that the Boundary Count rule is an unfair basis to determine the final of a World Cup.

Indian opener Rohit Sharma is the latest to join this outcry, signaling that there is an urgent need to revamp certain rules of cricket that, in this case, came at the heavy expense of New Zealand’s World Cup campaign.

In a tweet, Sharma said, “Some rules in cricket definitely needs a serious look in.”

Not just him, but several other famous cricketing personalities, along with thousands of fans have expressed their disappointment in the arbitrary nature of the rules that sealed the fate of World Cup:

The events of the evening were as follows: New Zealand, on the verge of victory 20 minutes earlier, needed 16 to win after England’s batting in the super over to win the World Cup. Out came Neesham and Guptill. Jofra Archer was given the dubious honour of bowling, quite a compliment for the novice.

A wide was followed by a mighty six from Neesham; then a misfield and we were back in familiar territory. Three runs needed off two balls, then two from the last one. It was established that if the match was tied England would win on the relatively random basis that they had hit more boundaries in the match.

Guptill hit to midwicket. Jason Roy’s throw was far from perfect but Buttler gathered it and dived for the stumps with Guptill a yard adrift. With the rule of Boundary Count coming into play, England won.

The umpires have also come under the scanner after Ben Stoke's controversial 'overthrow six' that driveled the final to a super-over in the first place. When sStokes accidentally deflected the ball, Kumar Dharmasena signalled six runs for the incident, meaning that England - who were staring down the barrel suddenly found hope. 2.

The Law 19.8 which speaks about “Overthrow or wilful act of fielder” which was first pointed out by ESPNCricinfo, is being cited again and again. The law states: “If the boundary results from an overthrow or from the wilful act of a fielder, the runs scored shall be any runs for penalties awarded to either side, and the allowance for the boundary, and the runs completed by the batsmen, together with the run in progress if they had already crossed at the instant of the throw or act.”