GET Stock QuotesNews18 APP
News18 English
Powered by cricketnext logo
»
3-min read

Excited on Becoming Grandmaster, R Praggnanandhaa Keen on Improving Training Schedule

12-year-old R Praggnanandhaa became an overnight sensation when news broke out about the Chennai boy becoming the second youngest and India’s 52nd Grandmaster, after finishing joint first in the recently concluded Gredine Open in Italy.

News18 Sports

Updated:July 5, 2018, 6:09 PM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Excited on Becoming Grandmaster, R Praggnanandhaa Keen on Improving Training Schedule
Twitter/ Chess.com - India
Loading...
12-year-old R Praggnanandhaa became an overnight sensation when news broke out about the Chennai boy becoming the second youngest and India’s 52nd Grandmaster, after finishing joint first in the recently concluded Gredine Open in Italy.

Back in 2016, Praggnanandhaa, at the age of 10 years and 9 months, had become the youngest International Master in the history of the game. From that point onwards, curiosity around the boy grew with him standing a chance to become the world’s youngest Grandmaster.

In a bid to achieve that dream, Praggnanandhaa played several tournaments around the world trying to earn GM norms. He even achieved the 2500 rating threshold but kept falling short.

Since becoming an International Master, Praggnanandhaa had only bagged one GM norm in the next year and ten months. Post failing to break Sergey Karjakin’s record, the boy breezed through his title requirements, taking three and a half months to score his two remaining GM norms and become the second youngest Grandmaster in history, with the final one coming in Ortisei.

“Actually, before the eighth round, I wasn’t aware that if I win, I will score a GM norm,” Praggnanandhaa told Firstpost. “But after the eighth round, when I realised that I had made it, I was exhilarated.”

During the Gredine Open, several reports stated that the 12-year-old could possibly score a GM norm after the seventh round. But Praggnanandhaa had not read them. In fact, he avoids reading the coverage about him, fearing what’s written might distract him during games.

“I hadn’t read those reports. Also, I don’t do that usually,” he revealed. “I fear if I read everything that’s written about me, I might keep thinking about it during my games. Especially, if I am having a bad tournament, reading these reports might disturb me.

At the conclusion of the Aeroflot Open earlier this year, it became evident that he will not be able to meet the requirements for the GM title before the March 10 deadline to break Sergey Karjakin’s record. Praggnanandhaa said that striving to break the record had taken its toll.

“There was some pressure at the time. But I was also playing continuous tournaments back then and in many tournaments, I felt quite tired.”

The 12-year-old was surprised by the welcome he received at the airport and was taken aback at the reception on his return.

“Actually, I hadn’t expected so many people to turn up,” the youngster said. “I thought a few people from my school would be there but I hadn’t expected media to be there. So yeah, I was quite surprised by that.”

Speaking about how he celebrated his achievement, Praggnanandhaa said, “After coming back to India, I went with my parents to the temple and some relatives visited me. So that was how I celebrated.

After his return, he went to meet Viswanathan Anand, India’s first ever Grandmaster. He again met the World champion in an event at Chennai, organized to felicitate him for winning the title.

“I went to his house. He congratulated me and then we were talking about my games,” the youngster said about his meeting with Anand. “He analysed some of them. At one point we were analysing my game against IM Hugo Ten Hertog from the Schaakweek tournament and suddenly he remembered one of his games he had played a long time ago. But I don’t remember who he played against.”

Despite his historic achievement, Praggnanandhaa said that he wants to increase his practice time and improve on his game. “I usually practice for four to five hours daily. But I want to change that. I want to work more on chess now and practice for an hour or two more, every day.

“I just want to improve my playing strength and increase my rating.”

R Praggnanandhaa’s next challenge is the Leon Masters in Spain which takes place from 6th to 8th July.
| Edited by: Abhimanyu Sen
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Loading...
Loading...