Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
Powered by cricketnext logo
News18 » Sports
2-min read

Chennai Open believed to be under match-fixing scanner

The secret documents in possession of CNN-IBN also revealed that over the past one decade 16 players, who had been in top-50 ATP rankings in some point in their career, have repeatedly been reported for suspicions of match-fixing.

CNN-IBN

Updated:January 19, 2016, 9:14 AM IST
facebookTwitter Pocket whatsapp
Chennai Open believed to be under match-fixing scanner
The secret documents in possession of CNN-IBN also revealed that over the past one decade 16 players, who had been in top-50 ATP rankings in some point in their career, have repeatedly been reported for suspicions of match-fixing.

The ugly face of match-fixing rocked the tennis world on Monday and there is a strong possibility that the Chennai Open, India’s only ATP tournament, could also have been used as a platform to fix matches.

In a CNN-IBN exclusive, it has been learnt that the Chennai Open is also believed to be under the scanner for match-fixing.

The Chennai Open in the past has seen the likes of Rafael Nadal, Carlos Moya, Patrick Rafter and other top players competing, and the most successful player in the history of the tournament has been a two-time Grand Slam Swiss champion Stanislas Wawrinka, who finished a hat-trick of titles, his fourth overall, in the Southern city this month.

Lack of sponsors saw the organisers say that the tournament would come to a halt after this year, but the main organiser later assured that the show would go on, at least till 2019.

However, if the allegations of match-fixing are proved true, it can raise a serious question mark over the future of the tournament as in a worst-case scenario, the sponsors may run away.

The secret documents in possession of CNN-IBN also revealed that over the past one decade, 16 players, who had been in top-50 of ATP rankings at some point in their respective careers, have repeatedly been reported for suspicions of match-fixing.

What's more astonishing is that the report suggests that the players fixed matches at Wimbledon, and one top-50 player, who is currently in action at the ongoing Australian Open in Melbourne, is suspected to lose his first-round matches repeatedly. The documents also show that there is a Grand Slam winner among the 16 suspected players, who has been repeatedly reported for losing matches suspiciously.

The documents revealed that players were targeted In their hotel rooms at major tournaments and the basic price to fix a match was around $50,000.

The document, which is a report prepared by retired officers of Scotland Yard, suggests that top tennis officials were regularly informed about rampant match-fixing and provided with substantial evidence, but they put cotton wool on their eyes and ignored the warnings.

The document also revealed that intricate match-fixing networks in North Italy, Sicily and Russia have been identified as three big groups. There are 11 accounts of Russian betting racket, either based in Moscow or St Petersburg, while the one in Sicily has 10 accounts.

The report also said that there were matches under investigation where both the players in a match were believed to be involved in fixing the result. The investigators had no doubt that these groups knew the result of many matches even before a ball was struck. Italian groups fix matches only involving Argentinian and Spanish players, and it has been identified as the most profitable group among the three.

The first match is believed to be fixed way back in 2007. The report also said that one player exchanged 82 messages with a gambler in Italy who cashed in on his matches, but when evidences were provided to top tennis authorities, they turned a blind eye.

However, the report didn’t reveal names of any suspected players; but if some of them are made public, it can tarnish the image of the sport severely as many of the tennis stars are not only the most popular sportspersons in the world but also earn a lot of money through it.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

facebookTwitter Pocket whatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results