Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

But the job is not done yet!
Vote for the deserving candidate this year.

Check your mail to know more

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
SPONSORED BY
Tech
»
1-min read

Live-Streaming Costs Life: China Issues Warning After 'Rooftopper' Falls to Death

"Some of them try to hype things up with obscene and dangerous things, and their purpose is to attract more eyeballs and make a profit".

Reuters

Updated:December 12, 2017, 8:46 PM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Live-Streaming Costs Life: China Issues Warning After 'Rooftopper' Falls to Death
Representative Image
Loading...
A young Chinese climbing enthusiast's fatal fall from a skyscraper while making a selfie video on a $15,000 "rooftopping" dare has spurred warnings by state media against the perils of live streaming. Wu Yongning plunged to his death from a 62-storey building in central China on Nov. 8, the day he stopped posting videos of his skyscraper exploits on Weibo, China's equivalent of Twitter. A month later, his girlfriend confirmed the death of the 26-year old in a Weibo post.

Wu, who had more than 60,000 followers of his Weibo account, was looking to win a prize of 100,000 yuan ($15,110) for a filmed stunt atop Huayuan Hua Centre in Changsha, capital of Hunan province, media said over the weekend. His death was a reminder of the need for stronger supervision of live streaming apps, the official China Daily said on Tuesday.

"Some of them try to hype things up with obscene and dangerous things, and their purpose is to attract more eyeballs and make a profit," it said in a commentary. Tens of thousands of Chinese post videos of themselves in a bid for stardom on the live streaming scene, whose popularity has grown rapidly, particularly in the e-commerce, social networking and gaming sectors.

Wu, who used to post videos of himself scaling tall buildings with no safety equipment, hoped to use the prize to pay his mother's medical bills, the Changsha Evening News said. It was unclear which live streaming platform Wu intended to post on.

"There should be a bottom line for live streaming platforms, and supervision should leave no loopholes," ran a comment in the online edition of the People's Daily. Wu's videos on his Weibo microblog had attracted several million views each.

Watch: OnePlus 5T Review | Better than OnePlus 5?


 
| Edited by: Sarthak Dogra
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
 
T&C Apply. ARN EU/04/19/13626
 

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
  • 01 d
  • 12 h
  • 38 m
  • 09 s
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results