Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

But the job is not done yet!
Vote for the deserving candidate this year.

Check your mail to know more

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
SPONSORED BY
Tech
»
1-min read

Most Massive Black Holes Spotted by NASA Telescope

Light from the most distant object began its journey to us when the universe was 1.4 billion years old or nearly 10 percent of its present age.

IANS

Updated:January 31, 2017, 11:56 AM IST
facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
Most Massive Black Holes Spotted by NASA Telescope
Representative image. (Image: REUTERS/NASA/JPL-Caltech)
Loading...
NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray space telescope has identified the farthest gamma-ray blazars, a type of galaxy whose intense emissions are powered by super-sized black holes.

"Despite their youth, these far-flung blazars host some of the most massive black holes known," said Roopesh Ojha, an astronomer at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

Light from the most distant object began its journey to us when the universe was 1.4 billion years old or nearly 10 percent of its present age.

Previously, the most distant blazars detected by Fermi emitted their light when the universe was about 2.1 billion years old.

"That they developed so early in cosmic history challenges current ideas of how supermassive black holes form and grow, and we want to find more of these objects to help us better understand the process," Ojha said while presenting the findings at the American Physical Society meeting in Washington on Monday.

Blazars constitute roughly half of the gamma-ray sources detected by Fermi's Large Area Telescope (LAT).

Also read: Now China in Race to Reach Mars

Astronomers think their high-energy emissions are powered by matter heated and torn apart as it falls from a storage, or accretion, disk toward a supermassive black hole with a million or more times the sun's mass.

"The main question now is how these huge black holes could have formed in such a young universe," one of the researchers Dario Gasparrini from Italian Space Agency's Science Data Centre in Rome said.

"We don't know what mechanisms triggered their rapid development," Gasparrini noted.

Two of the blazars that the team detected boast black holes of a billion solar masses or more. In the meantime, the team plans to continue a deep search for additional examples.

"We think Fermi has detected just the tip of the iceberg, the first examples of a galaxy population that previously has not been detected in gamma rays," said Marco Ajello from Clemson University in South Carolina, US.

Also read: Aliens? NASA Develops a Simple Way to Find Out
| Edited by: Krishna Sinha Chaudhury
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwittergoogleskypewhatsapp
 
T&C Apply. ARN EU/04/19/13626
 

Live TV

Loading...
Countdown To Elections Results
  • 01 d
  • 12 h
  • 38 m
  • 09 s
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results