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Moto X Force first impressions review: Does the shatterproof display warrant a Rs 50K price tag?

Moto X Force first impressions review: Does the shatterproof display warrant a Rs 50K price tag?

While the Moto X Force’s display technology makes it stand out in the crowded smartphone market, its hefty price tag, which the company generally has maintained a safe distance from, is being speculated by many as a roadblock in the phone’s success.

Ankit Tuteja
  • IBNLive.com
  • Last Updated: February 2, 2016, 3:18 PM IST
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The new Moto X Force may look more or less like its other Moto siblings, but there are two things about the phone that make it stand out. First is its display, which makes the Moto X Force the world’s first shatterproof phone, and the second is its Rs 50K price tag that makes it the most-expensive Moto phone available in the Indian market.

While the phone’s display technology makes it stand out in the crowded smartphone market, its hefty price tag, which the company generally has maintained a safe distance from, is being speculated by many as a roadblock in the phone’s success. While it’s too early for us to predict the Moto X Force’s fate, our first impressions of the handset could hint if it’s worth the price tag.

I have attended innumerable press conferences that are generally followed by hands-on with the devices at demo zones, but it was probably for the first time that I witnessed members of media conducting drop tests right there at the demo zone itself. Several critics, including me, dropped the Moto X Force, multiple times, from varying heights, on an uneven concrete surface, but the phone’s display stood by the company’s claims in the rough ride that we gave the phone.

The aluminium frame running along the phone, however, suffered a lot of dents and displayed some scratches, but the screen didn’t show any signs of cracks. So the most significant element in the phone, which the company is also heavily banking on, passed a few initial tests there itself at the launch event itself. It, however, is yet to undergo some more strenuous tests in our tech lab.

If you are wondering as to what makes the Moto X Force’s display so sturdy, in times when phone screens have traditionally been the weak spot, you might want to read our article explaining the technology behind the feature.

Amidst times when innovation in the the smartphone space has become stagnant, and companies are merely borrowing features from each other, Motorola manages to successfully bring in a significant innovation, which not only helps the phone score extra points, but is also seen a right step in display tech.

In terms of figures, the phone has a 5.4-inch Quad HD AMOLED display that renders 77 per cent more pixels than a full HD (1080p) display. Leaving aside the technical details, the display is great - both in terms of colour reproduction and viewing angles.

With such a large display, the phone may appear to be bulky, but it doesn’t feel heavy in the hand. Also, the curved design and a ballistic nylon finish (more or less like a finely woven pattern) at the back makes it easy to grip. Also, the pattern adorning the back adds to the phone’s elegance and protects it from scratches, dents, and fingerprint marks.

While we got to take a look at the back-colored variant, the phone comes in two more colours - grey and white. The grey one has the same ballistic nylon finish as the black, but the white-coloured Moto X Force comes with a soft grip rubber finish at the back.

In terms of storage variants, it has 32 GB and 64 GB models, with support for a micro SD card of up to 2 TB. The former will be available for Rs 49,999, while the latter carries a price tag of Rs 53,999.

The dual-SIM phone has a SIM card tray placed on top of the device, which supports either two SIM cards or a combination of SIM and microSD cards.

Coming to its camera, the phone sports a 21 megapixel rear camera with a dual-tone LED flash at the back and a 5 megapixel front camera with flash. While the rear camera left us impressed with its quality - in terms of details, colours, and brightness, the front camera couldn’t woo us as much. Like other Moto phones, the camera app in the Moto X Force offers a limited set of functions. We are yet to test the phone’s camera in different light environments.

The speaker located at the bottom in the front produces loud results, but when it comes to audio quality, you would expect more from it.

The X Force also packs in a 3760 mAh battery promising up to 30 hours of mixed use. This claim, however, can be verified only after extended use.

Based on Android Lollipop 5.1, the Moto X Force is engineered with Qualcomm Snapdragon 810 with up to 2.0 GHz octa-core CPUs coupled with 3 GB of RAM. Given that the Moto phones in the past have turned to be great on the performance front, we look forward to a lag-free, fast results on the X Force as well. We will soon put the X Force to different tests, and will update you about its performance.

The Moto X Force will be available across online and offline retail channels. In online retail, it will be available on Flipkart and Amazon. It will also debut across leading retail stores like Croma, Spice Hotspot in India starting from February 8.

Motorola India head Amit Boni, in an interview with IBNLive, said that one of the reasons to make the Moto X Force available in retail stores is to give users an environment where they can actually test the shatterproof ability of the phone.

Going by our first impressions of the phone, the price appears to be worth the price tag. But wait for our detailed review for the final verdict.


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