1-MIN READ

PUBG Mobile Ban: Chandigarh Lawyer Files PIL, Compares the Battle Royal Game to Drugs

Image for Representation

Image for Representation

PUBG is yet again being compared to drugs as it is making children 'addicted to violence.'

Kunal Khullar
  • Last Updated: January 21, 2020, 3:07 PM IST
Share this:

It seems like 2019 all over again as the popular game PlayerUnknowns Battlegrounds or PUBG is under scrutiny yet again. According to a report, the Union Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology has sent a communication to Chandigarh based lawyer advocate HC Arora, who had approached the Punjab and Haryana seeking a ban on the battle royale game in the city.

The high court had asked the Union Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology last month to make a decision on representation seeking the imposition of ban on PUBG, which apparently teaches only violence to children. According to VK Trivedi, Director, cyber laws and security at the Union Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology, "The high court's direction to consider and make a decision representation for banning "PUBG" is under examination by the ministry.”

Advocate HC Arora says that the game is making children addicted to violence, hence affecting their mental and physical development. He went on to say that PUBG is like addiction to drugs, which has destroyed the youth of the country, specifically in states like Punjab. “School going children who are losing interest in studies have become addicted to the game. The parents of such children are helpless. In case they insist the children to stop playing it, they become aggressive and go into depression,” the PIL had argued.

Last year in March, various cities of Gujarat including Rajkot and Ahmedabad had temporarily banned PUBG ahead of school examinations. Local police had issued a notice saying that anyone could report an instance of someone playing PUBG and the latter may face prosecution under the Central Government Act under Section 188. We had also reported various instances where people were detained at police stations.

Comparing a game to a drug is taking things a bit too far. Yes, the game is quite addictive but imposing a ban doesn’t seem like the right solution. Today’s youth is far too smart to find alternatives. Educating both the parents and children is something that is required rather than taking strict actions.


Share this:
Next Story

India

  • Active Cases

    3,851

     
  • Total Confirmed

    4,281

     
  • Cured/Discharged

    318

     
  • Total DEATHS

    111

     
Data Source: Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, India
Updated: April 06 (06:00 PM)
Hospitals & Testing centres

World

  • Active Cases

    984,905

     
  • Total Confirmed

    1,336,801

     
  • Cured/Discharged

    277,737

     
  • Total DEATHS

    74,159

     
Data Source: Johns Hopkins University, U.S. (www.jhu.edu)
Hospitals & Testing centres