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70-year-old Biking Grandmother Conquers Bolivia's Dangerous 'Death Road'

The world's most dangerous road spirals skyward nearly 11,000 feet, from the country's lowland jungles to the snow-capped peaks of the Andes.

Reuters

Updated:October 6, 2019, 12:01 PM IST
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70-year-old Biking Grandmother Conquers Bolivia's Dangerous 'Death Road'
Mirtha Munoz a 70-year-old runner participates in the Sky Race, Bolivia's toughest cycling competition - Bolivia Skyrace - Yolosa, La Paz, Bolivia - October 5, 2019 Mirtha Munoz in action during the Sky Race. The route known as "The way of death" to reach 4000 meters in the Andean mountains. REUTERS/David Mercado

La Paz: Bolivia's "Death Road" might seem an odd place for a septuagenarian grandmother on two wheels.

The world's most dangerous road spirals skyward nearly 11,000 feet, from the country's lowland jungles to the snow-capped peaks of the Andes. Fog, rain, rockslides and sheer cliffs are main attractions. The road has likely claimed thousands of lives.

But for 70-year-old Bolivian Mirtha Munoz, the oldest ever competitor in Bolivia's 60 km (37 mile) Skyrace, an extreme bike racing competition, it was a natural extension of a passion she picked up years ago.

Munoz took up biking on the advice of her family and a psychologist friend after her son died unexpectedly.

"He told me ... the bike could help me get through my pain, and to rebuild," she said.

Saturday's race was a pinnacle achievement, no pun intended.

"It's a vertical climb, you go up and up and there´s no rest," she told Reuters upon finishing the race.

Munoz, one of the race's founders, says she enjoys more low-key bike-riding with her six grandchildren, though admits she hopes the eldest, now approaching 18, will soon follow in her tracks.

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