Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
News18 » Auto
1-min read

Boeing Did Not include 'Key Safeguards' on 737 MAX Anti-stall System: Report

The earlier version of the system relied on multiple sensors and had 'limited ability to move the tanker's nose,' while the MAX's version received input from just one sensor and was 'tougher for pilots to override.'

PTI

Updated:September 30, 2019, 8:14 AM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Boeing Did Not include 'Key Safeguards' on 737 MAX Anti-stall System: Report
Representative image. (Reuters)

New York: Boeing left off "key safeguards" from the 737 MAX's anti-stall system that were included on an earlier version of the system used on a military tanker aircraft, the Wall Street Journal reported Sunday.

The model's MCAS anti-stall system has been implicated in two crashes that left a total of 346 people dead.

The earlier version of the system relied on multiple sensors and had "limited ability to move the tanker's nose," while the MAX's version received input from just one sensor and was "tougher for pilots to override," the newspaper said.

The Journal cited a person familiar with the system as saying the earlier version was designed to guard against problems.

"You don't want the solution to be worse than the initial problem," the person said.

A Boeing spokesman told the newspaper that the systems were "not directly comparable." In the MAX jets that crashed, pilots found themselves battling the system to keep the aircraft from diving into the ground.

Boeing is working on fixes to the MAX that will make the MCAS system more similar to the one used in the tanker, the newspaper said, citing people familiar with the matter.

More than six months after the grounding of the entire 737 MAX fleet, it is still unknown when the planes will return to the sky.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results