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'Can You See from Heaven?': Widow of Wuhan Covid-19 Whistleblower Doctor Gives Birth to 'Final Gift'

File photo of Li Wenliang, a 34-year-old doctor, who died of the deadly virus. (Weibo)

File photo of Li Wenliang, a 34-year-old doctor, who died of the deadly virus. (Weibo)

In death, Dr Li became the face of simmering anger at the ruling Communist Party's controls over information and complaints that officials lie about or hide disease outbreaks, industrial accidents, natural disasters and financial frauds, while punishing whistleblowers and independent journalists.

The widow of Li Wenliang, the 34-year-old Wuhan whistleblower doctor who succumbed to the COVID-19 in February, has given birth to their baby, the couple’s second child.

His wife Fu Xuejie shared the heartwarming news on Chinese social media platform WeChat. She delivered a baby boy, the Chinese state-run Litchi News reported.

"Can you see it from heaven? The last gift you gave me was born today. I will definitely take good care of them," she wrote on WeChat.

With the post, Fu shared the image of the “final gift” from her late husband Li – the baby boy.

Li, one of the eight whistleblowers who warned other medics of the coronavirus outbreak but were reprimanded by the police, died of the pandemic a week after he sent out word to doctors. He was the first to report about the virus way back in December last year when it first emerged in Wuhan, the provincial capital of China's central Hubei province.

He dropped a bombshell in his medical school alumni group on the popular Chinese messaging app WeChat that seven patients from a local seafood market had been diagnosed with a SARS-like illness and quarantined in his hospital.

Li explained that, according to a test he had seen, the illness was a coronavirus — a large family of viruses that includes severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) which led to 800 death in China and the world in 2003.

Li told his friends to warn their loved ones privately. But within hours screenshots of his messages had gone viral - without his name being blurred.

"When I saw them circulating online, I realised that it was out of my control and I would probably be punished," Li was quoted as saying CNN. Soon after he posted the message, Li was accused of rumour-mongering by the Wuhan police.

He was one of several medics targeted by the police for trying to blow the whistle on the deadly virus in the early weeks of the outbreak.

In death, Li became the face of simmering anger at the ruling Communist Party's controls over information and complaints that officials lie about or hide disease outbreaks, industrial accidents, natural disasters and financial frauds, while punishing whistleblowers and independent journalists.

Soon after his death, China exonerated the doctor in a startling admission of error by the ruling Communist Party that generally bodes no challenges to its authority.