Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
News18 » World
1-min read

Scientists Have an Intriguing New Theory on Link Between Eyebrows and Human Survival

Like the antlers on a stag, a pronounced brow ridge was a permanent signal of dominance and aggression in our early ancestors, said researchers at the University of York in the UK.

PTI

Updated:April 10, 2018, 6:59 PM IST
facebookTwitter Pocket whatsapp
Scientists Have an Intriguing New Theory on Link Between Eyebrows and Human Survival
Highly mobile eyebrows like Dwayne Johnson's may have played a crucial role in human survival, scientists said. (Photo: Pinterest)

London: Highly mobile eyebrows that can be used to express a wide range of subtle emotions may have played a crucial role in human survival, a study suggests.

Like the antlers on a stag, a pronounced brow ridge was a permanent signal of dominance and aggression in our early ancestors, said researchers at the University of York in the UK.

The modern humans traded this for a smooth forehead with more visible, hairy eyebrows capable of a greater range of movement, they said.

Mobile eyebrows gave us the communication skills to establish large, social networks; in particular to express more nuanced emotions such as recognition and sympathy, allowing for greater understanding and cooperation between people.

The study published in the journal Nature Ecology and Evolution contributes to a long-running academic debate about why other hominins, including our immediate ancestors, had gigantic brow ridges while anatomically modern humans evolved flatter foreheads.

"Looking at other animals can offer interesting clues as to what the function of a prominent brow ridge may have been," said Paul O'Higgins, a professor at the University of York.

"In mandrills, dominant males have brightly coloured swellings on either side of their muzzles to display their status," O'Higgins said.

"The growth of these lumps is triggered by hormonal factors and the bones underlying them are pitted with microscopic craters - a feature that can also be seen in the brow bones of archaic hominins," he said.

Using 3D engineering software, the researchers looked at the iconic brow ridge of a fossilised skull, known as Kabwe 1, held in the collections of the National History Museum.

It belonged to a species of archaic hominin - Homo heidelbergensis, who lived between 600,000 and 200,000 years ago.

The researchers said that sexually dimorphic display and social signalling is a convincing explanation for the jutting brows of our ancestors.

Their conversion to a more vertical brow in modern humans allowed for the display of friendlier emotions which helped form social bonds between individuals, they said.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

Read full article
Next Story
Next Story

facebookTwitter Pocket whatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results