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Sudan, Rebel Leaders Seal Peace Deal In Effort To End Wars

In this October 14, 2019 file photo, provided by the official SUNA news agency, Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, center right, head of Sudan's sovereign council, is greeted by South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, center left. (Image: AP/File)

In this October 14, 2019 file photo, provided by the official SUNA news agency, Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan, center right, head of Sudan's sovereign council, is greeted by South Sudan's President Salva Kiir, center left. (Image: AP/File)

The next biggest challenge is to work with all local and international partners to preach the agreement and its benefits, Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok tweeted on Friday upon his arrival at Juba, the capital of South Sudan.

Sudan's transitional authorities and a rebel alliance signed on Saturday a peace deal initialed in August that aims to put an end to the country’s decades-long civil wars, in a televised ceremony marking the agreement.

The next biggest challenge is to work with all local and international partners to preach the agreement and its benefits, Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok tweeted on Friday upon his arrival at Juba, the capital of South Sudan.

Reaching a negotiated settlement with rebels in Sudans far-flung provinces has been a crucial goal for the transitional government, which assumed power after a popular uprising led the military to overthrow President Omar al-Bashir in April 2019.

Sudanese civilian leaders hope the deal will allow them to revive the countrys battered economy by slashing military spending, which takes up much of the national budget.

Saturday’s official signing in Juba sealed the peace deal reached in late August between the Sudanese government and the Sudan Revolutionary Front, a coalition of several armed groups.

The summit was attended by South Sudan President Salva Kiir, whose own country gained independence from Sudan in 2011 following decades of civil war. The head of Sudans sovereign council, Gen. Abdel-Fattah Burhan and his deputy Gen. Mohammed Hamadan Dagalo, also attended the ceremony. Dagalo, the commander of paramilitary Rapid Support Forces, signed the agreement along with rebel leaders.

Also attending the ceremony were several foreign officials including the US Special Envoy for Sudan Donald Booth, African Union chairman Moussa Faki, and Egyptian Prime Minister Mustafa Madbouly, along with other African and Arab officials.

The deal would grant self-rule for the southern provinces of Blue Nile, South Kordofan and West Kordofan, according to a draft obtained by The Associated Press. Rebel forces would be integrated into Sudans armed forces.

The Sudan Revolutionary Front, centered in the western Darfur region, South Kordofan and Blue Nile, is part of the pro-democracy movement that led to the uprising against al-Bashir, but the rebels didnt fully support the military-civilian power-sharing deal. That deal includes a six-month deadline for achieving peace, which ran out in February.

Sudans largest single rebel group, the Sudan Liberation Movement-North led by Abdel-Aziz al-Hilu, was involved in the talks but has yet to reach a deal with the government.

Al-Hilu has called for a secular state with no role for religion in lawmaking, the disbanding of al-Bashirs militias and the revamping of the countrys military. The group has said if its demands are not met, it would call for self-determination in areas it controls in the Blue Nile and South Kordofan provinces.

Al-Hilu attended Saturdays ceremony and met with Hamdok and Kiir to discuss the ongoing talks between his movement and the government, according to Hamdoks office.

Another major rebel group, the Sudan Liberation Movement-Army, which is led by Abdel-Wahid Nour, rejects the transitional government and has not taken part in the talks.

Nours movement criticized the deal, saying in a statement it was not different from other previous deals that did not end the wars.

The Sudanese communist party, which is part of the protest movement that helped topple al-Bashir, also denounced the deal as a true threat to Sudans integrity and future.

The party said in a statement Thursday that the deal would create tensions and new disputes because other rebel groups and victims of the civil war did not join these talks.


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