Take the pledge to vote

For a better tommorow#AajSawaroApnaKal
  • I agree to receive emails from News18

  • I promise to vote in this year's elections no matter what the odds are.
  • Please check above checkbox.

    SUBMIT

Thank you for
taking the pledge

Vote responsibly as each vote counts
and makes a diffrence

Disclaimer:

Issued in public interest by HDFC Life. HDFC Life Insurance Company Limited (Formerly HDFC Standard Life Insurance Company Limited) (“HDFC Life”). CIN: L65110MH2000PLC128245, IRDAI Reg. No. 101 . The name/letters "HDFC" in the name/logo of the company belongs to Housing Development Finance Corporation Limited ("HDFC Limited") and is used by HDFC Life under an agreement entered into with HDFC Limited. ARN EU/04/19/13618
LIVE TV DownloadNews18 App
News18 English
News18 » World
1-min read

Swedish Town Councillor Proposes Sex Breaks on Work Time

Swedes should take a one-hour paid break from work to go home and have sex with their partners, a local councillor suggested in a proposal Tuesday aimed at improving people's personal relationships.

AFP

Updated:February 21, 2017, 9:28 PM IST
facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp
Image for representation only
Image for representation only. (Photo courtesy: AFP Relaxnews/ KatarzynaBialasiewicz / istockphoto)
Loading...

Swedes should take a one-hour paid break from work to go home and have sex with their partners, a local councillor suggested in a proposal Tuesday aimed at improving people's personal relationships.

"There are studies that show sex is healthy," Per-Erik Muskos, a 42-year-old city councillor for the northern town of Overtornea, told AFP after presenting the motion.

He said couples were not spending enough time with each other in today's society.

"It's about having better relationships," he said.

He noted there was no way to verify that employees do not use their hour for other purposes than spending time with their partners or spouses.

"You can't guarantee that a worker doesn't go out for a walk instead," Muskos said, adding that employers needed to trust their employees.

Muskos said he "saw no reason" why the motion wouldn't pass.

After the Finns and the French, Swedish full-time employees worked the least in Europe with only 1,685 hours on average in 2015, according to a study by economic research institute Coe-Rexecode.

Brits worked an average of 1,900 hours and Germans 1,847 hours in 2015.

Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox - subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what's happening in the world around you – in real time.

| Edited by: Bijaya Das
Read full article
Loading...
Next Story
Next Story

Also Watch

facebookTwitterskypewhatsapp

Live TV

Countdown To Elections Results
To Assembly Elections 2018 Results