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WHO Warns Fears of Omicron Could Spark New Vaccine Hoarding

Many questions remain about the severity, transmissibility and resistance to vaccines of the new omicron variant. (Representative image/REUTERS)

Many questions remain about the severity, transmissibility and resistance to vaccines of the new omicron variant. (Representative image/REUTERS)

Some wealthy governments want to leave no stone unturned to get their populations as close to full vaccination as possible.

The World Health Organization expressed concerns Thursday that rich countries spooked by the emergence of the omicron variant could step up the hoarding of COVID-19 vaccines and strain global supplies again, complicating efforts to stamp out the pandemic.

The U.N. health agency, after a meeting of its expert panel on vaccination, reiterated its advice to governments against the widespread use of boosters in their populations so that well-stocked countries instead can send doses to low-income countries that have largely lacked access to them.

What is going to shut down disease is for everybody who is especially at risk of disease to become vaccinated, said Dr. Kate OBrien, head of WHOs department of immunization, vaccines and biologicals. We seem to be taking our eye off that ball in countries.

Months of short supplies of COVID-19 vaccines have begun to ease over the last two months or so, and doses are finally getting to needier countries such as through donations and the U.N.-backed COVAX program and WHO wants that to continue. It has long decried vaccine inequity by which most doses have gone to people in rich countries, whose leaders locked down big stockpiles as a precautionary measure.

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As we head into whatever the omicron situation is going to be, there is risk that the global supply is again going to revert to high-income countries hoarding vaccine to protect in a sense, in excess their opportunity for vaccination, and a sort of no-regrets kind of approach, OBrien said.

Its not going to work, she added. Its not going to work from an epidemiological perspective, and its not going to work from a transmission perspective unless we actually have vaccine going to all countries, because where transmission continues, thats where the variants are going to come from.

Some wealthy governments want to leave no stone unturned to get their populations as close to full vaccination as possible. Many questions remain about the severity, transmissibility and resistance to vaccines of the new omicron variant, which emerged last month in southern Africa and has shown early signs of spreading faster than the widespread and deadly delta variant driving the pandemic now.

O'Brien urged a rational, global perspective about whats actually going to shut down this pandemic.

We have the tools at hand, we have the choices we can make, and the next days and weeks are really going to determine what direction the world decides its going to go in, on omicron, she said.

Nevertheless, WHO says individuals in rich countries should follow the policies of their governments, some of which are enticing people to get boosters, which are additional doses aimed to buck up immunity from earlier jabs that wanes over time.

An individual in a country, their dose is not going to get shipped to another country because they they dont take the dose, O'Brien said. "It is country governments, not individuals, who are making decisions that could influence the equitable distribution of vaccines to other countries.

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first published:December 09, 2021, 18:57 IST