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World's First Hospital Train Brings Hope to Indian Villages; See Pics

India | Reuters | April 15, 2018, 11:48 am
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 A patient walks past the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, parked at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

A patient walks past the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, parked at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Doctors perform middle ear surgery inside an operating theatre on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

Doctors perform middle ear surgery inside an operating theatre on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Patients and their relatives wait before the start of a cataract surgery on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

Patients and their relatives wait before the start of a cataract surgery on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Patients cover their eyes as they wait before their cataract surgery on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore, India. The Lifeline Express, a seven-coach train converted into a rolling hospital has crisscrossed India for 27 years to treat people living in areas with scarce healthcare. (Image: Reuters)

Patients cover their eyes as they wait before their cataract surgery on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore, India. The Lifeline Express, a seven-coach train converted into a rolling hospital has crisscrossed India for 27 years to treat people living in areas with scarce healthcare. (Image: Reuters)

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 Movan, 77, is helped by a nurse after her cataract surgery on the Lifeline Express.

Movan, 77, is helped by a nurse after her cataract surgery on the Lifeline Express. "I am never going to forget the name of this train, never in my life," Movan said. (Image: Reuters)

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 A pharmacist sits behind a medicine distribution counter inside a government Primary Health Centre in a village in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

A pharmacist sits behind a medicine distribution counter inside a government Primary Health Centre in a village in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Patients rest inside a recovery room after their middle ear surgery on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

Patients rest inside a recovery room after their middle ear surgery on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Dharmendra Singh, an ophthalmologist, speaks on his phone as he rests after conducting cataract surgery, on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

Dharmendra Singh, an ophthalmologist, speaks on his phone as he rests after conducting cataract surgery, on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Sanjay, 28, a staff cook, makes lunch on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

Sanjay, 28, a staff cook, makes lunch on the Lifeline Express, a hospital built inside a seven-coach train, at a railway station in Jalore. (Image: Reuters)

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 Bhawri Devi, 41, rests on the floor of her house after her middle ear surgery on the Lifeline Express.

Bhawri Devi, 41, rests on the floor of her house after her middle ear surgery on the Lifeline Express. "I was thinking that I had cancer in my brain. I had all kinds of thoughts. I went to the government district hospital, but there was no ENT surgeon. When I went to a private hospital they asked me for 50,000 rupees. I didn't even have 5,000 rupees," said Devi. "I heard about this train a month back. It took me about 12 hours to reach the hospital from my village... I am glad that I will be able to hear my grandchildren's voice... I won't go deaf." (Image: Reuters)

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 Bhawri Devi (L), 41, watches as her husband and son push an auto-rickshaw which got stuck in the sand on the way home, in a village in Jalore.

Bhawri Devi (L), 41, watches as her husband and son push an auto-rickshaw which got stuck in the sand on the way home, in a village in Jalore. "I was thinking that I had cancer in my brain. I had all kinds of thoughts. I went to the government district hospital, but there was no ENT surgeon. When I went to a private hospital they asked me for 50,000 rupees. I didn't even have 5,000 rupees," said Devi. "I heard about this train a month back. It took me about 12 hours to reach the hospital from my village... I am glad that I will be able to hear my grandchildren's voice... I won't go deaf." (Image: Reuters)