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In pics: The Indian legends music lost

Music | IBNLive | January 24, 2011, 2:49 pm
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[caption id=<img class="size-full wp-image-783073" src="http://revamp.ibnlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/bhimsenjoshi_316.jpg" alt="Pandit Bhimsen Joshi's death marks the end of an era in Indian classical music. We pay a tribute to some of India's legendary singers and instrumentalists.

Music maestro Bhimsen Joshi breathed his last on January 24, 2011. The veteran vocalist and Bharat Ratna was the last of the titans of Hindustani classical music and a rare genius who could transcend the mundane and transport his audience to the sublime with his gifted voice.

What made him arguably the most popular Hindustani music vocalist of the current times was his impassioned renditions with a powerful and penetrating voice that showcased the aesthetic majesty of the 'Kirana' gharana of which he was the celebrated exponent, as also the eloquent expression of light classical, devotional and the popular variety." /> Pandit Bhimsen Joshi's death marks the end of an era in Indian classical music. We pay a tribute to some of India's legendary singers and instrumentalists.

Music maestro Bhimsen Joshi breathed his last on January 24, 2011. The veteran vocalist and Bharat Ratna was the last of the titans of Hindustani classical music and a rare genius who could transcend the mundane and transport his audience to the sublime with his gifted voice.

What made him arguably the most popular Hindustani music vocalist of the current times was his impassioned renditions with a powerful and penetrating voice that showcased the aesthetic majesty of the 'Kirana' gharana of which he was the celebrated exponent, as also the eloquent expression of light classical, devotional and the popular variety.[/caption]" title="[caption id="attachment_783073"]<img class="size-full wp-image-783073" src="http://revamp.ibnlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/bhimsenjoshi_316.jpg" alt="Pandit Bhimsen Joshi's death marks the end of an era in Indian classical music. We pay a tribute to some of India's legendary singers and instrumentalists.

Music maestro Bhimsen Joshi breathed his last on January 24, 2011. The veteran vocalist and Bharat Ratna was the last of the titans of Hindustani classical music and a rare genius who could transcend the mundane and transport his audience to the sublime with his gifted voice.

What made him arguably the most popular Hindustani music vocalist of the current times was his impassioned renditions with a powerful and penetrating voice that showcased the aesthetic majesty of the 'Kirana' gharana of which he was the celebrated exponent, as also the eloquent expression of light classical, devotional and the popular variety." />
Pandit Bhimsen Joshi's death marks the end of an era in Indian classical music. We pay a tribute to some of India's legendary singers and instrumentalists.

Music maestro Bhimsen Joshi breathed his last on January 24, 2011. The veteran vocalist and Bharat Ratna was the last of the titans of Hindustani classical music and a rare genius who could transcend the mundane and transport his audience to the sublime with his gifted voice.

What made him arguably the most popular Hindustani music vocalist of the current times was his impassioned renditions with a powerful and penetrating voice that showcased the aesthetic majesty of the 'Kirana' gharana of which he was the celebrated exponent, as also the eloquent expression of light classical, devotional and the popular variety.[/caption]">
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[caption id="attachment_783073"]<img class="size-full wp-image-783073" src="http://revamp.ibnlive.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/bhimsenjoshi_316.jpg" alt="Pandit Bhimsen Joshi's death marks the end of an era in Indian classical music. We pay a tribute to some of India's legendary singers and instrumentalists.

Music maestro Bhimsen Joshi breathed his last on January 24, 2011. The veteran vocalist and Bharat Ratna was the last of the titans of Hindustani classical music and a rare genius who could transcend the mundane and transport his audience to the sublime with his gifted voice.

What made him arguably the most popular Hindustani music vocalist of the current times was his impassioned renditions with a powerful and penetrating voice that showcased the aesthetic majesty of the 'Kirana' gharana of which he was the celebrated exponent, as also the eloquent expression of light classical, devotional and the popular variety." />
Pandit Bhimsen Joshi's death marks the end of an era in Indian classical music. We pay a tribute to some of India's legendary singers and instrumentalists.

Music maestro Bhimsen Joshi breathed his last on January 24, 2011. The veteran vocalist and Bharat Ratna was the last of the titans of Hindustani classical music and a rare genius who could transcend the mundane and transport his audience to the sublime with his gifted voice.

What made him arguably the most popular Hindustani music vocalist of the current times was his impassioned renditions with a powerful and penetrating voice that showcased the aesthetic majesty of the 'Kirana' gharana of which he was the celebrated exponent, as also the eloquent expression of light classical, devotional and the popular variety.[/caption]

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 Legendary Rabindra Sangeet exponent Suchitra Mitra passed away at the age of 86. Born in 1924, Suchitra Mitra had for six decades kept music lovers enthralled with her mellifluous rendition of Tagore songs, and her records and CDs top the popularity ratings even today. Daughter of litterateur Saurindra Mohan Mukherjee, she received her first lessons from eminent singer-composer Pankaj Mullick and then went to Santiniketan with a scholarship. Her singing skills were sharpened under the guidance of experts like Shantidev Ghosh and Shailajaranjan Mazumdar. She made her first recording in 1945.
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Legendary Rabindra Sangeet exponent Suchitra Mitra passed away at the age of 86. Born in 1924, Suchitra Mitra had for six decades kept music lovers enthralled with her mellifluous rendition of Tagore songs, and her records and CDs top the popularity ratings even today. Daughter of litterateur Saurindra Mohan Mukherjee, she received her first lessons from eminent singer-composer Pankaj Mullick and then went to Santiniketan with a scholarship. Her singing skills were sharpened under the guidance of experts like Shantidev Ghosh and Shailajaranjan Mazumdar. She made her first recording in 1945.

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 Also known as 'MS', Subbulakshmi was a renowned Carnatic vocalist. She was the first musician ever to be awarded the Bharat Ratna, India's highest civilian honor. She is the first Indian musician to receive the Ramon Magsaysay award, Asia's highest civilian award, in 1974.
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Also known as 'MS', Subbulakshmi was a renowned Carnatic vocalist. She was the first musician ever to be awarded the Bharat Ratna, India's highest civilian honor. She is the first Indian musician to receive the Ramon Magsaysay award, Asia's highest civilian award, in 1974.

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 Shehnai maestro Bismillah Khan was the third classical musician to be awarded the Bharat Ratna in 2001, the highest civilian honour in India and gained worldwide acclaim for playing the shehnai for more than eight decades. Though a pious Shi'ite Muslim, he was also, like many Indian musicians, regardless of religion, a devotee of Saraswati, and often played at Hindu temples, including the famous Vishwanath Temple in Varanasi, on the banks of the river Ganges.
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Shehnai maestro Bismillah Khan was the third classical musician to be awarded the Bharat Ratna in 2001, the highest civilian honour in India and gained worldwide acclaim for playing the shehnai for more than eight decades. Though a pious Shi'ite Muslim, he was also, like many Indian musicians, regardless of religion, a devotee of Saraswati, and often played at Hindu temples, including the famous Vishwanath Temple in Varanasi, on the banks of the river Ganges.

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 Legendary Bengali singer Ramkumar Chattopadhyay was known for popularising the 'Shyama sangeet' - songs dedicated to Hindu goddess Kali - and 'tappa' composed by musician Nidhu Babu in West Bengal. He was a huge hit with the masses in West Bengal and Bangladesh for his funny and playful spin-offs on traditional music.
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Legendary Bengali singer Ramkumar Chattopadhyay was known for popularising the 'Shyama sangeet' - songs dedicated to Hindu goddess Kali - and 'tappa' composed by musician Nidhu Babu in West Bengal. He was a huge hit with the masses in West Bengal and Bangladesh for his funny and playful spin-offs on traditional music.

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 Carnatic and Tamil film playback singer DK Pattammal was part of the female trinity of carnatic music, with two other popular musicians MS Subbulakshmi and ML Vasanthakumari, who were instrumental in the large scale initiation of women into the main stream carnatic music world. She was a recipient of Padma Bhushan and Padma Vibhushan awards in 1971 and 1998. Pattammal was also conferred with the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award in 1961 and the Sangeetha Kalanidhi in 1970. She was elected Fellow of Sangeet Natak Akademi in 1992.
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Carnatic and Tamil film playback singer DK Pattammal was part of the female trinity of carnatic music, with two other popular musicians MS Subbulakshmi and ML Vasanthakumari, who were instrumental in the large scale initiation of women into the main stream carnatic music world. She was a recipient of Padma Bhushan and Padma Vibhushan awards in 1971 and 1998. Pattammal was also conferred with the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award in 1961 and the Sangeetha Kalanidhi in 1970. She was elected Fellow of Sangeet Natak Akademi in 1992.

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 Gangubai Hangal was an Indian singer of the 'khyal' genre of Hindustani classical music, known for her deep and powerful voice. Hangal belonged to the Kirana gharana. Hangal's family was considered to be of low social status and for women of her generation singing was not considered appropriate employment; Hangal struggled against this prejudice and made a career. She performed all over India and for All India Radio stations until 1945. Hangal had initially performed light classical genres, including bhajan and thumri, but concentrated on khyal. Later, however, she refused to sing light classical and sang only ragas. Hangal served as honorary music professor of the Karnatak University. She gave her last concert in March 2006 to mark her 75th career year. She had overcome bone marrow cancer in 2003, and died of cardiac arrest at the age of 96 in 2009, in Hubli, where she resided.
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Gangubai Hangal was an Indian singer of the 'khyal' genre of Hindustani classical music, known for her deep and powerful voice. Hangal belonged to the Kirana gharana. Hangal's family was considered to be of low social status and for women of her generation singing was not considered appropriate employment; Hangal struggled against this prejudice and made a career. She performed all over India and for All India Radio stations until 1945. Hangal had initially performed light classical genres, including bhajan and thumri, but concentrated on khyal. Later, however, she refused to sing light classical and sang only ragas. Hangal served as honorary music professor of the Karnatak University. She gave her last concert in March 2006 to mark her 75th career year. She had overcome bone marrow cancer in 2003, and died of cardiac arrest at the age of 96 in 2009, in Hubli, where she resided.

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 Begum Akhtar was an Indian vocalist of Ghazal, Dadra and Thumri. Her first public performance was at the age of fifteen. She also acted in several Bollywood films, including Mumtaz Beghum (1934), Jawaani Ka Nasha(1935) and King for a Day (1933). She received the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for vocal music, and was awarded Padma Shri and Padma Bhushan (posthumously) by Government of India. Akhtar was barely seven when she was captivated by the music of Chandra Bai, an artist attached to a touring theatre group. However at her uncle's insistence she was sent to train under Ustad Imdad Khan, the great sarangi exponent from Patna, and later under Ata Mohammed Khan of Patiala.
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Begum Akhtar was an Indian vocalist of Ghazal, Dadra and Thumri. Her first public performance was at the age of fifteen. She also acted in several Bollywood films, including Mumtaz Beghum (1934), Jawaani Ka Nasha(1935) and King for a Day (1933). She received the Sangeet Natak Akademi Award for vocal music, and was awarded Padma Shri and Padma Bhushan (posthumously) by Government of India. Akhtar was barely seven when she was captivated by the music of Chandra Bai, an artist attached to a touring theatre group. However at her uncle's insistence she was sent to train under Ustad Imdad Khan, the great sarangi exponent from Patna, and later under Ata Mohammed Khan of Patiala.

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[caption id=
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[caption id="attachment_783081"] Alla Rakha Khan was an Indian tabla player and a frequent accompanist of Ravi Shankar. Alla Rakha was born in Jammu and Kashmir. He became fascinated with the sound and rhythm of the tabla at the age of 12, while staying with his uncle in Gurdaspur. The determined young lad ran away from home, became a disciple of and began studying tabla with Mian Kader Baksh of the Punjab gharana. He studied voice and Raag Vidya under Ashiq Ali Khan of the Patiala gharana. His regimen of practice and dedication were legendary.[/caption]

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 Asgari Bai was a renowned Indian Dhrupad singer and recipient of Padma Shri, Tansen Samman, Academy Samman and Shikhar Samman. She has also been felicitated with Nari Shakti Samman. The artiste enthralled music lovers not only in Madhya Pradesh but also across the country with her unique style and talent for decades. Asgari Bai acquired extraordinary expertise in Dhrupad to reign as the main court singer for the Orchha dynasty. She was also invited by other royal families to treat music lovers to her spellbinding voice.
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Asgari Bai was a renowned Indian Dhrupad singer and recipient of Padma Shri, Tansen Samman, Academy Samman and Shikhar Samman. She has also been felicitated with Nari Shakti Samman. The artiste enthralled music lovers not only in Madhya Pradesh but also across the country with her unique style and talent for decades. Asgari Bai acquired extraordinary expertise in Dhrupad to reign as the main court singer for the Orchha dynasty. She was also invited by other royal families to treat music lovers to her spellbinding voice.

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