NASA Shares Amazing Pictures of Stars, Planetary Nebulas & Supernova Remnants

Tech | Trending Desk | September 11, 2020, 11:44 am
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 National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has time and again shared amazing images of celestial objects. Sometimes, it also puts out simulations to show how planets or objects in space would appear when seen from a particular place.<br /><br />Recently, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has produced some impressive images of stars, planetary nebulas, supernova remnants and galaxies. Named after the Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, the observatory came up with the first light image of supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. Besides, in 2000, high school students took help of the data from the telescope to find out a neutron star in supernova remnant IC 443. (Image: Reuters)
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has time and again shared amazing images of celestial objects. Sometimes, it also puts out simulations to show how planets or objects in space would appear when seen from a particular place.

Recently, NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has produced some impressive images of stars, planetary nebulas, supernova remnants and galaxies. Named after the Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, the observatory came up with the first light image of supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. Besides, in 2000, high school students took help of the data from the telescope to find out a neutron star in supernova remnant IC 443. (Image: Reuters)

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 <strong>Eta Carinae</strong>: It is a volatile system having two massive stars. They closely orbit each other. According to NASA, it is one such candidate that may explode as a supernova in our galaxy. “This image has three types of light: optical data from Hubble (appearing as white), ultraviolet (cyan) from Hubble, and X-rays from Chandra (appearing as purple emission),” said the US space agency. (Image: NASA)
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Eta Carinae: It is a volatile system having two massive stars. They closely orbit each other. According to NASA, it is one such candidate that may explode as a supernova in our galaxy. “This image has three types of light: optical data from Hubble (appearing as white), ultraviolet (cyan) from Hubble, and X-rays from Chandra (appearing as purple emission),” said the US space agency. (Image: NASA)

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 <strong>Abell 2744</strong>: It is galaxy cluster whose photo combines X-rays from Chandra with optical light data from Hubble. These clusters are the largest objects in the universe and they are held together by gravity. They glow brightly in X-rays as they contain enormous amounts of superheated gas. (Image: NASA)
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Abell 2744: It is galaxy cluster whose photo combines X-rays from Chandra with optical light data from Hubble. These clusters are the largest objects in the universe and they are held together by gravity. They glow brightly in X-rays as they contain enormous amounts of superheated gas. (Image: NASA)

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 <strong>Cartwheel Galaxy</strong>: The bull’s eye resemblance of this galaxy is partly due the fact that a smaller galaxy passes through its middle. Reason behind the large amount of star formation in this galaxy is because of the violent collision that produced shock waves. (Image: NASA)
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Cartwheel Galaxy: The bull’s eye resemblance of this galaxy is partly due the fact that a smaller galaxy passes through its middle. Reason behind the large amount of star formation in this galaxy is because of the violent collision that produced shock waves. (Image: NASA)

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 <strong>SN 87A</strong>: In the southern hemisphere, a new object in a nearby galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud was observed in February 1987. As it was one of the brightest supernova explosions in centuries, it came to be known as Supernova 1987A or SN 87A. (Image: NASA)
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SN 87A: In the southern hemisphere, a new object in a nearby galaxy called the Large Magellanic Cloud was observed in February 1987. As it was one of the brightest supernova explosions in centuries, it came to be known as Supernova 1987A or SN 87A. (Image: NASA)

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 <strong>Helix Nebula</strong>: The picture of Helix Nebula relies on data from optical light from Hubble (orange and blue), ultraviolet from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (cyan), Chandra's X-rays (appearing as white) and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (green and red). (Image: NASA)
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Helix Nebula: The picture of Helix Nebula relies on data from optical light from Hubble (orange and blue), ultraviolet from NASA's Galaxy Evolution Explorer (cyan), Chandra's X-rays (appearing as white) and NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope (green and red). (Image: NASA)

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 <strong>M82</strong>: M82 is a galaxy whose complete name is Messier 82. Oriented edge-on to Earth, this galaxy provides astronomers and their telescopes a fascinating view showing what transpires when it undergoes bursts of star formation. (Image: NASA)
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M82: M82 is a galaxy whose complete name is Messier 82. Oriented edge-on to Earth, this galaxy provides astronomers and their telescopes a fascinating view showing what transpires when it undergoes bursts of star formation. (Image: NASA)

  • First Published: September 11, 2020, 11:44 am

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