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UPSC asked to withdraw proforma which demands photographs showing disability from applicants

Oct 14, 2014 03:24 PM IST India India
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New Delhi: In an interim reprieve for the differently abled Union Public Service Commission (UPSC) aspirants, the Court of Chief Commissioner for Persons with Disability has directed the commission to withdraw its proforma in which applicants had to provide photographs showing their disability as a proof.

The order has been issued after Satendra Singh, who claimed that he was earlier rejected by UPSC because of his disability, complained against the new directive. "Despite valid certificates, why was UPSC asking for photographs," he had questioned.

Now only 'permanent disability certificate' which have been issued from a government hospital will be treated as a valid proof.

In its letter to the UPSC, the Court noted, "The Chief Commissioner of Persons with Disabilities has directed to accept the disability certificate of the persons with disabilities in the existing format. Your comments in the matter are to reach Court within 20 days of the recipient of the communication (dated September 22)."

The direction of the UPSC had got sharp reactions with many differently abled women calling it discriminatory. "This is insensitive, as a woman I would never want to show a picture of my disability. It is a violation of human rights," a student from Miranda House college of Delhi University had said.

According to activists, this is against rules as the amended Persons with Disabilities Rules 2009, which were circulated to all the ministries accept only disability certificate and does not ask anyone to show disability.

Though CCPD's directive has come as a temporary respite for people with disability, the question they are asking is that when they already have a valid certificate from a government doctor, what is the need to ask them to furnish pictures of their disability.

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