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Future bleak for madarsa students

Mar 19, 2006 01:50 PM IST India India
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Rawa (Haryana): Two languages and one text that is what students studying in madarsas are learning in Haryana villages thanks to the non-availabilty of Urdu in government schools.

The primary school in Giasaniabas has only Muslim children as students and not only does it have a handful of teachers but also just one room for five classes.

"When I came here, I started teaching in a shed meant for keeping cows. I did not have a chair or a table. I taught like that for years," a teacher Abid Hussien said.

Another teacher, Kasim Azad, says that there is an urgent need to recruit more teachers.


"There is a desperate need for 800-900 more teachers. There is no infrastructure either," Azad adds.

Giasaniabas' primary school typifies the rot that has set in the primary education system in Haryana.

Until last year, it did not even have a building. On paper, there are two posts for teachers, but only one appointment has been made so far.

Mewat region of Haryana is dominated by Muslims and government schools do not teach Urdu.

Madarsas fill in the demand and while they have always been around like the one at Ferozepur Jhirka, new ones are coming up and older ones expanding.

Then, there are Madarsas for girls only and they are mushrooming in private homes also.

Inspite of the fact that the madarsas have been adhering to an ancient syllabi, they have a higher number of students than the local primary schools and Rawa is a case in point.

"The purpose of all these Madarsas that have come up is to eliminate the evil in the world through good education," Maulana Hafiz Sher Mahammad says.

"I want to become a religious instructor so that the world embraces our religion," a student Shehnaz says.

Her mother says that when a child studies the Quran, seven generations of that family attain liberation.

But for the children of Mewat in Haryana the future seems dim as the goivernment schools are dysfunctional and madarsas adhere to an ancient syllabi.

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