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PM Narendra Modi calls for collaboration with Japan for research, skill development

Sep 01, 2014 10:11 AM IST India India
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Tokyo: In his address to businessmen at the Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Prime Minister Narendra Modi said that India is trying to achieve Japanese level of efficiency in the PMO as well as seek Japan's help in skill development in India. Modi said that India and Japan need to work together in order to lead the world economy.

The Prime Minister said India's huge young population can contribute to the global workforce requirement. While addressing business leaders at a luncheon in Tokyo, Modi also said that he wanted Japan's help in developing skill development in India. He said Japan can "really help us with this".

Modi also mentioned the NDA government has taken many initiatives in its first 100 days. "Already in the first quarter we have changed the growth rate. The growth rate jumped to 5.9 per cent since we came," he said.

He also cited the example of Gujarat to woo business leaders of Japan.

Modi said that if the Gujarat experience is a parameter, then "that response, that speed", businesses will get in India.

The Prime Minister also announced the creation of a special management team exclusively for Japan in the PMO.

Addressing business leaders in Tokyo, Modi said that a team that carries out industrial work, will "now have two people from Japan".

Those two Japanese people will "permanently sit with them and be a part of decision making".

The team will be a part of the Prime Ministers Office (PMO), said Modi during the third day of his Japan sojourn.

"Just like ease of business, this initiative will be like ease for Japan."

Modi and Japanese PM Shinzo Abe are expected to sign a host of key agreements on Monday and hold a joint press conference later this afternoon. While there is expected to be consensus on boosting trade and defence ties, no confirmation yet on the civilian nuclear agreement, though discussions are ongoing.